Archive for the ‘Mathematics’ Category

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27.9 Little Feather Fibonacci

October 17, 2012

This last little quilt of my “three little quilt series” is a second Fibonacci quilt, made with the same green Fibonacci fabric, but this is with a different border.

I am less in love with this little border than the cute bubble border on the last Fibonacci quilt but I am leaving it, I quilted it up a little more.

This is also the quilt that on these little borders, I unquilted what I had done, and I had also learned a valuable lesson about bobbin thread.

I am going to show you backwards, the “finished quilting picture” and then move back to show the changes and details.

I call this quilt Feather Fibonacci.

Lets look at the inside fibonacci feather first.

I have been taking the class “beyond the basics” over on craftsy.  And Ann Peterson has you do a ton of feathers.

Well I watched all through the video, of them drawing the feathers, and then quilting them, and I decided the spiral arm looks like a feather spine.

I actually have drawn a couple of times some feathers on my little graph paper notebook some feathers, working out how to move from one feather to the next without always going back to the spine the way Ann does.

And after seeing some close up posts on feathers, I decided to use the method – Start one feather, branch that from the spine, connect to the first feather, then travel the tip of the 2nd feather. then branch off the feather end.

And continue in this way, feather, spine, trace over feather, feather, spine, trace over feather….

Which is an efficient way to quilt but takes some getting used to if you want plump feathers coming off instead of long skinny ones.

Not too terrible for my attempt.

Valuable lesson on this quilt #1.

You don’t have to match the backing fabric to the front, but don’t use a contrasting thread  in the bobbin from the front of the quilt.

Unless your tension is A-100% perfect and can always control your needle, that bobbin thread is going to show through.

Now I admit I wasn’t as ‘analytical’ (read the shortened version of the word) on getting the tension perfect before-hand, so I am not surprised. But I did it and kept going, even when I saw the red thread piling up on the green fabric.

Here’s the back.

Why I chose red thread for the back?  I don’t know.

Probably had more to do with the fact that I had red thread on the bobbin already and I did not have a dark blue on another bobbin.

You can see that for the pebbling practice (aka practice from Craftsy Quilting Negative Spaces with Angela Walters), I chose blue bobbin thread and this was no problem at all.

Only because I ripped out 5 pebbles that looked horrendous with red thread.

Speaking of ripping ….

Let’s talk borders.

The borders of this quilt are dark blue with lots of pattern. no issue with the red bleeding out. But I didn’t like the quilting done initially on the borders. It was my design and I did not like.

The long diamonds just didn’t work all that well for me. I couldn’t execute them well. They were sagging in the middle, and it kept feeling very ‘draggy’ making them.

So I picked them out, watching a bit more of the craftsy class. And then decided to remake them. Same design. Each one shorter Blue on both top & bottom.

Looking closely I still have some tension issues, but now I don’t notice them. And the design is tighter, it’s more coherent, and travels better down the quilt.

But it does blend in so much, it’s really providing texture rather than design.

So where do I go from here?  I think I will NOT rip out the feather despite the red thread showing through.  But I will play it up a tiny bit as intentional – provides some interest. The way I’ll do this I think is to have a very thin red line of piping around the side of the binding.

To make the binding dark blue or green (probably blue) and then a tiny bit of red, just a tiny bit, it will be interesting in color just enough, and then I can move on.

But … one issue. I’ve never done piping on a quilt before.  Next thing to learn. Although the kicker binding will give me some practice enough!

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27.8 Little Fibonacci Quilt – Minimalist Style

October 15, 2012

So the 2nd quilt of my three mini quilts that I’ve been working on this past week is one quilt in a set of 2.
I took a motif that I loved in a fabric that I really didn’t own a ton of.  I cut up the large portion of the motif and made a mini quilt out of it.

Then I framed the quilt.  I used little borders of coordinating fabrics that I thought I would like in a polka-dot apron.  You can tell these fabrics are part of a set.

I quilted this minimally.

Currently you can see the fold line on the quilt, there is so little quilting on the quilt.

Hopefully for this quilt, the minimal style quilting will win out in the end. The next one, quite similar, is much more heavily quilted.

Here’s a close up of the curve.

This is obviously a quilt where the design influenced the quilting style.  I could make one more spiral a little ways out from the fibonacci curve, but I want this to be simple, simple.

So I decided to do one quick little decorative stitch, all while I had my quilting foot on the machine.  Key is to go steady and you’ll be fine.

This quilt taught me to “hold back” and “go steady.  And that you can still quilt decorative stitches with the darning foot. And it’s simple and I just like it.

Which is all a quilt ever really needs to be. Something somebody liked at one time!

Currently the fabric you see on the back, an olive green with the same dot family, is on tap to be the binding on this quilt. I am joining the binding straight edge, so I’ll see what that process is like since I’m really not all “that experienced” on binding.

And I am considering doing a blog post and/or podcast on TaDa Triangles and kicker bindings since people have been curious about both of those items based off my last podcast.

But before that, the more heavily quilted partner to this quilt, the Feather Fibonacci (to be shown at a later date).

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25.1 SQ Ep 041 – Samurai Sudoku Quilt

April 22, 2012

Podcast Feed

Classic Sudoku and Quilts

You ever heard of a Sudoku quilt before?

Sudoku is a puzzle game, much in the style of magic square type of math game.

Each section of the Sudoku puzzle is it’s own little nine patch, (a 3 x 3 grid) with each box of the nine patch has a number from 1 to 9 in it.

There are traditionally nine sections in a Sudoku puzzle, each section is laid out in it’s own nine patch box. A 3 x 3 grid of sections.

Traditionally, the rule for the puzzle is as follows.

Each box in each section has a number 1-9, with no repeats.

Each box in each row (of three sections) has a number 1-9, with no repeats.

Each box in each column (of three sections) has a number 1-9, with no repeats.

Here is a picture of a printed Sudoku puzzle that is not filled out.

You can easily see the shape of the traditional (classic) sudoku pattern as a series of three nine patch blocks in three rows. A nine patch of nine patches. (fractal for those of us math nerds)

You can see some designs in how and which numbers are included with the puzzle as well.

Well, a while ago, some quilter got it in his/her head that we could use these puzzles easily in quilts. Quilts are squares, Sudoku puzzles are squares, nine patches look like Sudoku boxes.

And I’ve seen a couple of people use fabric or colors to symbolize each number.

If each of the numbers is represented by a specific color OR a specific fabric, then this turns into a very easy (just have a design wall) quilt to make. Straight stitches, nine patches. You can include sashing around the nine patches to signify the darker lines.

This quilt takes 9 of the same colors or fabrics, so you may be able to use 9 fat quarters or 9 fat eights to complete depending on the size of the quilt you want to make.

And you should be able to find Sudoku quilt patterns to purchase if you do not want to actually do the puzzle yourself. Or ask your kids (or other recipient) to do the puzzle and then give it back to you completed, and then you make a surprise quilt, including the picture of the original puzzle on the back.

Sudoku Quilt Variations Using Classic Sudoku Patterns

If you wanted to be a little different, what about setting the Sudoku quilt patches in attic windows to designate the quilt blocks?

Don’t want to do the whole puzzle? Just make the starting numbers and leave the rest blank!

Or go ahead and give them the actual numbers using applique with the method of your choice.

Here’s a link to 21 different ideas with Sudoku quilts and art!

Super Sudoku Quilts Using More Complicated Sudoku-Based Puzzles

  • Samurai Sudoku

Samurai Sudoku is a set of 5 Sudoku puzzles superimposed onto each other.

There are 5 puzzles next to each other that overlap in four areas.

The image below I haven’t put the time into getting the correct colors into the correct locations, but this is just an image that shows how the Samurai Sudoku quilt would appear.

If you’re having a hard time finding the overlapping sections, you could always use sashing colors to designate the different puzzles.

To get your own puzzle, you can look at samurai-sudoku.com Just look through the archive until you find an easy pattern and try it on your own. You can always download the solutions.

Also another good Sudoku reference for puzzles of all kinds (including the original and the next ones) that you can print the incomplete puzzle or the solution to the puzzle.

For making a quilt of this kind, you need 41 of the same colors for the blocks for this quilt.

If we use 2 inches finished as the size of your squares inside the block, then the quilt pictured above is 55 by 55, or if you use charm pack sized squares 4 inch finished square then the quilt can be 97 inches square.

It’s easier to upsize and downsize this quilt since it’s so simple!

  • Nonomino Puzzles

Nonomino puzzle is like Sudoku in that there are still rules of Sudoku, such as only one of each number for each row, and then one of each number for each column.

The difference is that instead of a ‘nine patch block’ shape, the blocks are irregular shaped. There are still 1-9 numbers in each block that don’t repeat.

Here is a nonomino puzzle with sashing designating the different groups available for sets of numbers 1-9.

And if I would only do the starting squares on this puzzle instead of filling it all in it would look like this:

Here’s a general sudoku puzzle site that has many variations of sudoku including nonomino and samurai styles of sudoku to try, print, and save.

Like Puzzles, Like Quilts? Send people back to this post and this podcast.

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23.0 Mathematics and German

February 20, 2012

I really really want to do this pattern that I found from a link off of a link to a site in Germany. At least the website is German and also English. And the pattern is also in English.

I’ve never bought a pattern overseas before, but this would be totally worth it. But I’ve also never really used a quilt pattern before either. Not fully anyway.

The quilt that was created was located here, and I could buy the pattern here.

And I was thinking that the part that scares me the most is the buying something overseas, but I really shouldn’t worry that much, I assume it happens all the time.

I also would be taking a while to match my colors I think.

But I would be totally stoked in making this design!

Stellated icosidodekahedron

If you’re reading this when it posts, I’ll be up the road at a retreat, thinking about/sewing on my own quilts!

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18.7 SQ Episode 030 – Angles in Quilting: Part C Polygons

August 21, 2011

Podcast Feed

We’re back with more angles in quilting, and we’re tackling the 5, 6, & 8 sided figures – pentagons, hexagons, & octagons respectively.

What more can be said about these blocks?

IN GENERAL:

  • These blocks provide lots of challenges to piecing.  These shapes are not typically pieced the same way as triangles and quadrilaterals.
  • Account for a much smaller share of the quilting pie than triangles and quadrilaterals.
  • Think of the general ‘shape’ of the block overall due to coloring or outlining stars of specific points

Techniques used for these block colors other than piecing.

  • applique onto the background
  • set in seams (yuk say most of you)
  • english paper piecing
  • adding two blocks of smaller # of sides together to create these shapes
  • subtracting part of a square or rectangle to create these shapes
  • (foundation) paper piecing and cutting back a specific angles

Star blocks

5 sided star has 10 sides, 6 sided star has 12 sides, and you guessed it, 8 pointed block has 16 sides!

How to avoid set in seams

Adding two blocks together or subtracting from the corners of a block.

Pentagons

  • house block (square + rectangle)
  • cut off the top two corners of a rectangular sashing block
  • dresden plate w/ curved bottom side

Hexagons

  • two trapezoids (half hexagon in quiltspeak) – likely isosceles
  • 6 triangles (isosceles or equilateral)
  • weather vane piece (squished pacman block) either pieced w/ square & 2 triangles OR two parallelograms butted next to each other
  • irregular hexagon, one central triangle, and 3 triangles on the outside could be scalene, isosceles or other based on the shape
  • piece of sashing with all 4 corners removed, with the corners on the thin side meeting at a single point
  • album / autograph block – square with opposite corners removed.

Octagons

  • 8 isosceles triangles together in the center (think spider web or kalidescope)
  • remove all 4 corners from a square shape with the points on no sides matching

Some quilt blocks from EQ7

Pentagons & “pentagon influenced shapes”

Hexagons & hexagon influenced shapes.

Octagons & octagon shapes.

Other things of note:

And look at my Journey Steps on the floor.  Doesn’t look big enough, does it?

Need to do more.

Also you need to go to SeamedUP and sign up to put in projects.  And encourage me to do so too!

And friend me at SeamedUP, scientificquilter. :)

Additional Resources:

Pentagon 3D shapes

Pentagon flowers (not 3D), look like GMFG, but more complicated – very pretty!

Paperpieces.com where you find many different card stock weight precut polygons of all shapes.

Link to english paper piecing video (watched w/ the sound off -don’t ask why-, hope it’s helpful)

Don’t you wanna say this in text after this episode?  Here’s hoping that I remember what this means later and that I didn’t inadvertently spell something that is commonly thought of as BAD.  If so – sorry, blaming innocence here.

OMG GMFG!  OFW WTG!

Send me 1 and a half inch light batik strips if you are looking to downsize your strips. (comment or scientificquilter@gmail.com)

To see the first 2 podcast show notes in this series, go to Part A: Triangles, and Part B: Quadrilaterals.

Additional Music:

Mevio’s Music Alley

  • Maori King by Greg Johnson

Freesound.org

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18.3 SQ Episode 029 – Angles in Quilting: Part B Quadrilaterals

August 13, 2011

Podcast Feed

Now we’re looking at 4 sided figures in quilting – Quadrilaterals!

We have lots of kinds of Quadrilaterals from geometry class

Prallelogram Family

  • Square
  • Rectangle
  • Rhombus
    • Diamonds!
  • Parallelograms

Other Quads

  • Kite
  • Trapezoid
    • isocelese trapezoid
    • regular trapezoid
  • Random Shaped Quadrilaterals

Squares

  • all 90 degree angles
  • all equal sides
  • vertical, horizontal and diagonal symmetry
  • is a rectangle
  • is a rhombus
  • is a parallelogram
  • usually no bias edges

Rectangles

  • all 90 degree angles
  • opposite sides are equal length
  • opposite sides are parallel
  • vertical & horizontal symmetry
  • is a paralellogram
  • usually no bias edges

(green is squares, yellow is rectangles)

Rhombus

  • all equal sides
  • opposite sides are parallel
  • diagonal symmetry
  • is a parallelogram
  • potentially some bias on 2 sides usually
  • quilters call these diamonds

Parallelogram

  • opposite sides are equal length
  • opposite sides are parallel
  • no symmetry necessarily unless special case above
  • potentially some bias on 2 sides usually

Kite

  • adjacent sides are equal length
  • opposite angles are equal
  • diagonal symmetry one direction
  • lots of bias edges
  • one definition could make a kite = a rhombus
  • one definition says that the shorter length does not equal the longer length

(dark red = parallelogram, pink = rhombus(diamond), blue = kite)

Trapezoid

  • one set of opposite sides are parallel
  • no particular symmetry
  • cut a corner off a rectangle or square
  • created from strip sets

Isosceles Trapezoid

  • adjacent angles are equal to each other
  • one set of opposite sides are equal length
  • symmetry along one axis
  • created from strip sets and/or isosceles triangles

(trapezoid = black, both isosceles and regular)

Four sided quilt patches are everywhere!

Crossing the Streams is ‘BAD’.

 

If you like exploring 2D figures, and you like books, and you like podcasts, check out Flatland on CraftLit.

 

Ecosystem notebook from Barnes N Noble

A4 sized Grid notebook

Music

Freesound.org

 

(This is funny too, not in episode)

 

Mevio’s Music Alley

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17.9 SQ Episosde 028 – Angles in Quilting: Part A Triangles

July 31, 2011

Podcast Feed

It’s All about Triangles & Quilting!

We pay homage to one of the cornerstones of quilting – the lowly triangle!

Three sides, three angles, three major descriptions of triangles.

1. Scalene triangle

  • 3 different length sides
  • 3 different sized angles
  • typically used in setting triangles
  • easier to paper piece
  • no lines of symmetry – cannot accidentally flip the block over to fix a mistake
  • can be a right triangle (one angle = 90 degrees)
  • typical triangle found in math class 30, 60, 90
  • can be called half rectangle triangles in quilting

Found in:

  • tilted blocks (as setting triangles)
  • wonky blocks
  • mariner’s compass blocks
  • palm blocks
  • birds of paradise blocks

Eye searing pink blocks are just SOME examples of scalene triangles in these blocks.

2.  Isosceles traingle

  • 2 equal length sides
  • 2 equally sized angles
  • most commonly found in quilting
  • Half Square Triangle – HST
  • Quarter Square Triangle – QST
  • one line of symmetry, flip around the ‘odd’ angle
  • can be a right triangle (HST, QST, flying geese)
  • how you cut could have one bias edge (the hypotenuse) or two (the shorter legs)
  • typical triangle found in math class 45, 45, 90
  • triangle with an acute ‘odd angle’ – kaleidoscope block

Found in:

  • pinwheel
  • broken dishes
  • flying geese
  • ohio star
  • hourglass
  • square in a square
  • friendship star
  • spool
  • maple leaf
  • kalidescope …..

Look for the black triangle to see some of the isosceles triangles in these quilt blocks (there’s many many more)

3. Equalateral triangle

  • 3 sides equal length
  • 3 equally sized angles
  • least commonly found in quilting
  • 6 triangles can make a hexagon block
  • all angles are 60 degrees –  no exceptions
  • 3 angles of symmetry, flip around any angle
  • guaranteed to have 2 sides of bias edges

Found in:

  • thousand pyramid blocks
  • chevron designs
  • strip pieced hexagons
  • tumbling blocks
  • bordered thousand pyramid blocks

Hmm

Look at the yellow any block to see the equilateral triangle (assuming the image doesn’t get squished somewhere)

Triangle Math Websites:

Home Sewing Front

Working on periodic spiral quilt – mostly basted, now need sewn together

Need an outline behind the spiral for it to stand out from the background

Exothermic quilt - see previous post about my place on this quilt as of a week ago.

Exothermic quilt on point:

Design decisions to make on the exothermic quilt:

  • Borders are GOOD – do NOT fix them
  • On point or not?
  • If so, have to fix coping black/ grey inner border
  • How much more black fabric to buy?
  • Paralllelograms in the middle stay or go?  – it provides good movement, but too much of a distraction??

HAVE YOU SEEN:

  • a 5 x 8 sized graph paper notebook for sale?  If so, what brand, where are you finding them, have you seen them online?
  • I would love a notebook this sized to carry around more easily!

A MUST HAVE book for anyone wanting to hand / machine quilt with specific designs:

501 Quilting motifs: Designs for Hand or Machine Quilting from the editors of Quiltmaker Magazine

  • Takes one motif and slightly changes it, multiplies it, rotates and flips it,
  • gives dimensions on block size for motif found in book.
  • looks easy to trace and adapt
  • great resource
  • hardbound
  • spiral inside

If you want to Swap Charm (5 inch) squares, go to this swap on Swap – Bot:

I’m willing to join if there is a good & healthy number of people in the swap!

You have until Sept 2, 2011 to make your decision!

Music

From Mevio’s Music Alley

From Freesound.org

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