Archive for the ‘Quilting’ Category

h1

38.0 Kansas City Regional Quilt Festival – Diary – Day 2 – Part 2 – Judged quilts and Categories

July 6, 2015

The weekend of June 19th – 21 was the Kansas City Regional Quilt Festival otherwise known as #KCRQF.

I have decided I had so much to say about the quilt show that I would write down in diary format what I went through on different days of the festival, share possibly a few stories, and pretend to take you along with me to the festival.

I am in the middle of covering Saturday, my main day of seeing the festival. My last post was about the guild quilts, and my post about that was the friday twilter meetup day.

So after taking the pictures of all the guild quilts I was ready to go do something else, look at vendors maybe. But when I got back up to the front, two ladies with sheets and golf pencils were there, ready to ask if I would help in determining viewers choice for all the guild quilts.

How could I decline?

So I went back through trying to decipher all what quilt fits into what category. Because the quilts on this side were organized by guild, this made it much harder to pick a favorite. What if my actual favorite was in the back and I failed to go back and see the quilt again?

Organization of Guild Quilts & Quilt Show Categories

Also some categories had only a few entrants, and some categories had many many entrants.

The categories for this show were:

  • Pieced Hand Quilted
  • Pieced Machine Quilted
  • Applique Hand Quilted
  • Applique Machine Quilted
  • Mixed Techniques Hand Quilted
  • Mixed Techniques Machine Quilted
  • Innovative

There were only a few hand quilted items. VERY impressive, but most of the hand quilted quilts were only competing against a few other quilts. These were hard to find in the show.

They were exquisitely done, don’t get me wrong, but perhaps all the handquilting needs to be in a category by itself so there are more quilts to be judged against?

Just a thought.

The Mixed Techniques Machine quilted category has about 100 quilts, the Pieced Machine Quilted category has about 200 quilts, and Innovative has about 30 quilts.

It’d be interesting to see a different way for the show to be broken up.

Perhaps the unevenness of the quilts is due to the fact that we were not limited by how many quilts in each category we could put into the show for the guild side of the show. I know my two quilts went in as the same category, so they competed against each other.

Anyway, the quilt I put down for viewers best of show I somehow failed to get the name of the quilter, so I cannot attribute this quilt to anyone correctly right now.

applique quilt best of show for me

applique quilt best of show for me

I think I was mesmerized by the crystals on the borders. Blurry picture below. Oops.

blurry picture of borders

blurry picture of borders

There were many quilts, and it was fun to run back and forth down the isles, making quick marks on the side of the paper to see which quilts would win in each category. Unfortunately I didn’t take track of my voting sheet for posterity.

After voting for the quilts, it was already lunch time, and the remaining twilters were meeting for lunch.

We had decided this time not to go “off campus” for lunch because parking the day before was hard. So we went back to the connecting Sheraton hotel and had a fancy lunch with hardly any other guests.

No pictures of this event, what were we thinking??

Anyway, it was nice to sit and learn about the private lives of the twilters who came by and to share some thoughts about etsy, quilting, traveling, home life, past lives. I think this was the lunch where I was more quiet & listened a lot. It was so neet just being with friends we haven’t really seen, but have had a chance connecting with online in many different ways.

I still had vendors to see & shop, the judged quilts to photograph, and the Beatles quilts to go view before we left. AND I wanted a picture of the 3 of us who worked on the round robin quilt. We were mostly separate for the afternoon, I went off on my own again, met up with Jackie & her friend Jackie occasionally on the vendor floor, Tami & Valerie went off to rest … it was a big trip and there is a lot of walking involved here.

three of seven twilters entwined

I didn’t take too many pictures of vendors because that was the only possible restriction for pictures for the show. Some vendors rightfully so don’t want people to take pictures of their quilts and patterns. Not all of them, but some, and that’s understandable.

I walked by several vendors I knew from other shows, some I had spoken to before, some I had not. One was Caitlyn who used to be in our guild who opened up her own modern fabric store that she even rented space from a local downtown area for about a year and a half. It was nice to see her again!

Also I met with Nikki who helps with the Quilts of Valor and is a member of like 2-3 guilds (not mine though) and we have become facebook friends and have similar tastes in quilts. She keeps telling me I should join the Modern guild. If they met in the afternoon, I’d consider it.

I zeroed in on a few vendor items I wanted to come back to later. Then onto the judged quilts.

How the Judged Quilts worked in KCRQF

The judged quilts were open to anyone who wanted to enter their quilts into the show who got in their entry in time with enough space.

I do not know if they cut off certain categories early, but entrants had the entire month of March to enter their quilts for the show. I was seeing they were still requesting submissions at the end of March.

There were no jury on the quilts, it seemed to be “first come, first served”. Each entrant could only enter one quilt per category. And you didn’t have to be a member of any of the guilds to be entered into the show. Or even local. Most were though.

The same 7 categories were in the judged quilts as were for the guild quilts above. Again, it seemed like there were not as many hand quilted items as machine quilted items. A few categories had less than 10 entrants.

This side was also less entered than the guild side. I was glad to see the guild quilts strong, but surprised how few people entered their quilts for judging. Perhaps we all want to get the quilts at the show, but don’t want to know what the judges have to say about the quilts.

My quilt was WAY down at the back of the show, at the end, right near the food. So people would have to see it if they were heading towards the food at the back of the show from the judged quilt section.

DSC00582

I love it, but was surprised how dark the quilt seemed compared to the other quilts around it.

My guild members were great at telling me they thought it could have won something. It is definitely dramatic looking. I tried not to spend too much time hovering around my quilt. Unfortunately, it was hanging next to a truly innovative quilt. One I kept seeing people go up to and exclaiming how good it was! And I liked it too.

I had put my quilt in innovative and should have put it into another category, pieced machine quilted. I really thought it would have more chance in this category. I decided early & quickly to put it into the show, and then thought later about the category a little more.

Anyway, here are some of the judged quilts I saw & took pictures of. Again in gallery form. I was way less diligent at getting names on all the quilts here, so instead I am just going to label all the quilts the same. More about the show in the next post.

h1

37.6 How Round Robins Work

May 23, 2015

This is a post describing how round robins work, or rather, how our round robin worked, complete with pictures.

If you missed a while on the blog or were redirected here from elsewhere, I was included in a multi-group internet friends (twilter-twitter quilter friend) round robin quilt exchange.

One fantastic lady, Daisy of Lazy Daisy Quilts decided to put together a round robin quilt exchange and asked for signups from interested people back at the beginning of 2014.

There were enough ladies who wanted to participate that we had 3 groups: Twilter Round Robin Group A, Twilter Round Robin Group B, Twilter Round Robin Group C. Our group was Group A

Basic Definition of a Round Robin quilt exchange:

Round Robin quilts are long-term projects in which each person works on other peoples’ projects during the time of the round robin, passing along a quilt idea, fabric, and a rapidly growing partial quilt top to each participant until the quilt ends back in the original quilter’s possession.

For me, it all started off with a pattern from electric quilt, a fabric choice & then a block.

center for round robin quilt darla

Here’s the first question I am asked when talking about the round robin: How does it work?

Generally, a round robin quilt (as our group did it) is an agreement between friends or strangers and friends to work on a quilt of someone else’s with the understanding that they will work on yours in return.

My role in the round robin:

  1. I made the center of the quilt. I decided what colors to be used & original quilt direction.
  2. I selected fabrics for the quilt to use in the quilt.
  3. I provide some kind of guidelines or suggestions to the others in the group for working on the quilt.
  4. I send the quilt onto the next person in the list (in the mail or in person). I am always sending to the same next person.
  5. I receive someone else’s quilt in the mail, with their center (or more), their fabrics, their instructions. I am always receiving a quilt from the same previous person.
  6. I work through an appropriate design to add a border to the outside of the quilt. Using math, graph paper, books or websites for inspiration, sometimes electronic quilt blocks or suggestion from Electric Quilt 7 (EQ7).
  7. I follow general guidelines by the round robin coordinator for each round to help spur imagination or direct the appropriate design. Not to be used religiously with all quilts in all situations, but to help stretch each quilter, and attempt to provide harmony with the finished project.
  8. I finish my section of the new border, sometimes making changes due to size restrictions, or fabric shortages which happens because we’re not always great at figuring out in advance what fabrics others would be appealing to the general design or just underestimation. Sometimes this step also requires purchasing fabric of our own.
  9. I write down something interesting in the process in the quilt journal. (optional) I write my name on a label provided by the original quilter (optional, but fantastically helpful in the end).
  10. I send the quilt top with my new border to the same next person in line.
  11. Receive the new quilt, repeat steps 5-10 until the original quilt comes back. I have a full quilt top and a full label and journal.

Twilter Round Robin Group A final collage

 

The coordinator has a lot of decisions to make before getting the round robin started.

The round robin coordinator’s role:

  1. They decide the groups (if more than 6 want to be part of the round robin) 5-6 people seem to be a good match for this round robin.
  2. They create a deadline for each border swap.
  3. The estimate the approximate amount of each type of fabric needed to make the quilt work, suggest the amount of background fabric, focus fabric, and other fabric to be used in making of a quilt top.
  4. The estimate the sizes of each of the borders to be proportional to the space on the quilt.
  5. They create general guidelines to help direct the future quiltmakers down a path to help create a good quilt and/or to ask people to work out of their own comfort zones.
  6. They coordinate the addresses and order of each person to do the round robin.
  7. They answer general questions, help figure out if deadlines need adjusted.
  8. They type up all the info and get it to the participants. Follow up if needed in some areas. Perhaps some handholding or drama-gathering if needed in some groups.
  9. Remind us it’s all fun.

Round Robin Twilter Group A

As you can see above, we had 6 different quilts with 6 different personalities and styles.

How does the passing of the quilts work?

Because we had a round that we passed quilts on to each other, and each person was in a different order, we were able to affect each quilt at a different stage of its development.

  • The first two quilts each of us received, we were only beginning to shape the look and feel of the quilt to follow.
  • The next round brought the middle into focus, the meat of the quilt,
  • The last two rounds were on the finishing side of the round, these were larger & took up more time & fabric.

Our round went like this:

Daisy passes to me, I pass to Diane, Diane pass to Laura, Laura pass to Tami, Tami pass to Tina, Tina pass to Daisy.

twilter round robin how the quilts got passed in a round

And each of us had our own version of that. The drawing above shows how the quilts were passed around.

My role in the round robin Group A, and the quilts as I saw them in the order I worked on them

Round 1 – Daisy

Since Daisy’s was the first round robin quilt I saw, it was the first one I worked on, and thus the smallest round to do.

This is a collage of the completed quilt of Daisy’s (on the left), the block as I received it, and the block as I finished it.

daisys finished quilt center and my portion

Once completed, I wrote in the journal, and on the label, then sent it in the mail to Diane.

Once Daisy was finished with the next quilt – Tina’s quilt, she sent it in the mail to me. As you will see I was always receiving from Daisy and sending to Diane. So I really only had to have 1 address.

Round 2 – Tina

Tina’s quilt only had her center and Daisy’s first border. The sky was the limit here.

tinas finished quilt center and my portion

The picture above is Tina’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 3 – Tami

At the “halfway point” everyone was working on the opposite person’s quilt. I was working on Tami’s quilt when she was working on mine.

tamis finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Tami’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 4 – Laura

Laura’s quilt was based on neutral fabrics. Greys and browns dominated the landscape of this quilt top with dramatic golds and blue hues thrown in for a smidge of color

lauras finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Laura’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 5 – Diane

Diane’s quilt was mostly done. I was trying to figure out an appropriate finish for her quilt.

dianes finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Diane’s finished quilt on the left. Which is also the portion that I worked on and sent out to her. Top right is the original block, bottom right is the quilt top as I received it.

More notes about Round Robin Quilts & observations

Since it was a center-focused round robin where we added further borders to the outside of an already ‘finished’ project, so the projects usually take on a medallion feeling.

Each quilter has to essentially be a “border designer”, and has to be willing to either ‘do the math’ or make a program (like EQ7) do the math for them.

I used inspiration from either drawing graph paper, or Electric Quilt 7, or a book on borders, or pinterest pictures, or various books on techniques. Sometimes I tried several different versions of the quilt, but once I kept seeing one version in my mind more than 1 day, that is the variation I went with.

There is an option to do rows instead of medallion rounds, which would be the same amount of work on the last one as on the first one. This would work in a similar way, but are usually called “Row Robin” quilts instead.

The first round we received, we had a shortened timeframe, but we had less size to finish before sending it off. This was stressful for me, but I did get the quilt done by or close to the deadline most of the time.

Each swap we had different goals, different color pallets, different visions to try to work into the quilts. It is truly a good way to sew out of the comfort zone.

And since the twilters who were interested in this swap were all over the US, the boxes got some post office traveling time around the country.

Some of the early quilts I worked on, I was completely surprised with at the end.

We got to learn about each person as reading through the journal entries of the original quiltmaker, in addition to things other people said in the journal. I was inspired by things in the journal in addition to other blocks and items I saw elsewhere. Many times the journal dictated the “tone” of the quilt more than anything!

Math was very helpful in the round robin. Having the original dimensions of each quilt, then trying to figure out how to put blocks together with appropriate spacers was challenging, but a heck of a lot of fun.

It helped me to use a program like EQ7 to help with the math and to visually see if the blocks I were doing were too big or not big enough or if I needed to add spacers.

Often times, I used my moleskin graph paper the most as it was the perfect thing to visually count other parts of the quilt.

Another note was to not try to overshadow the other people’s work. Since I try to do “big bold complicated” this was a constant worry for me, and something that at times reigned me in, and other times I probably ignored. Looking back, I ended up adding a darker border many times to the quilts I received. I don’t know if/what that says about me.

The most important part is to leave a part of yourself in the quilt that you’re working on. Being true to who I am is very important to me, even if I don’t always know what that looks like. So even during the “potential overshadows” I may/maynot have done, I still made quilts that were pleasing to me, that were something that I could do as well as I could.

That’s what matters & that is what’s special about these quilts.

In summary (visual)

The quilts as I worked on them, the center block, what I did to them, and their final product.

Round Robin Progress

Yay for round robins with friends!

 

h1

36.6 I am Planning on Entering Kings Puzzle quilt in a Regional Show!

February 28, 2015

Hey everyone! Long time no see here.

I have been working on projects for others. Until 2 weeks ago, I went to a retreat, and I finally finished up the borders on my Royal Red Kings Puzzle quilt.

And I have a great picture of it. Okay, still slanted, but I may have actually gotten the reds & greys close to accurate — do you know how hard it is to photograph such a graphic quilt?

Ta-Da!

Royal Red Kings Puzzle Quilt Top With Borders

Anyway, there is a regional show here in Kansas City. The Kansas City Regional Quilt Festival.

I was tired of deadlines and not wanting to think about the quilt show, so I bailed for the guild selection of quilts. However, after I brought this beauty out at the guild retreat, I had more than one person come up & tell me this quilt needed to be entered.

The show for judged quilts is first come, first served, it is not juried. There are also guild entries that each guild selects to represent their guilds. I was hesitant when we decided to vote on quilts for the guild, but now I am sticking my neck out there wider & getting this quilt judged! AS long as it makes it in time.

I am heading to fill out the form right now, as soon as I am done with this post. First day for postmark on the quilts is tomorrow, so hopefully the mail here won’t be too slow for my entry to show up late at the headquarters. We do have a slow mail system, but I can’t mail it until Monday afternoon.

Anyway, for those of you keeping reference, the pattern of the center of this quilt is called King’s Puzzle, made by Lois Hatleberg. I contacted her and she is fine with me putting this quilt in the show.

And since I had all the extra dark reds I collected to find the last border, I pieced the backing into also a square. I tried to go from light to dark, inside to out.

Royal Red Kings Puzzle Backing

This quilt will be the first one that I don’t do start to finish. I know I could figure out & work through quilting this quilt on my own, but since I want some form of custom work on this quilt, and I don’t own a long arm, and it takes me enough time loading & unloading when I rent the long arm, that I would get frazzled doing this sort of work in a shop where everyone could see me.

So I am reaching out to Artfully Quilted by Sandy Morgan Cockrum to quilt this quilt. We’re meeting to discuss next week. Here’s hoping that meeting goes as planned on both sides. She does amazing work and may work well for this “modern style” quilt. I do have to figure out what category this is going into. Maybe modern? There aren’t many categories.

In Other Quilt Show news:

The show is also making me extra excited because several #twilter friends are going to come & make a special trip for a meetup! What a great day when I found out they were coming!

If you’re coming, buy tickets through the website rather than in person if you can. Or I assume you can contact me & I can get you the tickets myself once I have them to sell.

The website for the show is http://kcrqf.com

Looking forward to it. Maybe I’ll see YOU there! And if so, maybe you’ll see MY quilt? I hope so!

h1

35.6 Golden Card Trick Quilt

June 22, 2014

In my “year of FMQ” I have sat down and finally quilted this card trick quilt that I have had in the works since April of 2009. Making it my oldest UFO.

I do realize that there still needs to be one small line I missed on the card trick block itself and the corners aren’t tacked down – said I would get to them later & forgot that I never finished them until after I put my FMQ foot away for the day.

card trick showing the quilting full

The card trick & square in square blocks are quilted on the top with a golden/orange contrasting thread.

card trick straight quilting in orange brown thread

But the threads on the straight lines in the ditch around the blocks are much lighter – a light taupe for some of the straight lines.  For the swirly details I decided to pick a color in between the lighter taupe and the golden/orange, and use a golden yellow color thread for quilting.

card trick quilting ring around diamond in square fmq

Quilting is swirls and long feathers in a box around this section.

And circles and a pinched block for the middle of the blocks.

card trick quilting in between the tricks quilting

This quilting went rather well, and is the largest thing I have pushed through my Janome Magnolia machine. Not too hard to do, but too much bigger would be harder than this.

A small amount of success for finishing the quilting. I have been weary of “overquilting” this quilt, but I think this one plays nicely with some curves and some straight line free motion quilting. I have basic straight lines in the borders.

straight line border quilting

I could alternate with fills, but currently they are left plain, which is fine with me at this time.

h1

35.4 Requilting the Dancing Ribbons Quilt

June 15, 2014

This quilt has had a LOT of ‘redos’ on it, and now I am redoing the”final” quilting as well. This project was considered finished in January of 2013, I put down the 20th to be exact. It has been hanging on the back of my front door in the time since the quilt has been finished – the sleeve went on long ago.

The recent talk of some of my online quilting friends of Round Robins has lead me to look at many different Round Robin pictures on Pinterest & other places, which has caused me to think of how delightful this Dancing Ribbons would look as an on-point center of a larger quilt.

I have been subscribed to Ann Peterson’s Craftsy class “Quilting Big Projects on a Small Machine”, and I was watching it recently, and I think I can take her medallion quilt techniques and put corners on this quilt and set the already quilted quilt on point.

The original design.

Dancing Ribbons at the Show

This quilt has always been special, but it has been missing the “fantastic-ness” I usually love in quilting. That AND I LOVE changing things up, adding a little bit more, and a little bit more.

All this talk about Round Robins and turning a quilt on point reminds me of my favorite picture of my small dancing ribbons quilt.

Dancing Ribbons Quilt

I have also recently been watching Cindy Needham’s Craftsy class on Wholecloth Quilting and between two two classes, I have been brave enough last weekend to rip off the binding, rip out the piping and rip out the adequate but not spectacular FMQ done on the outer edge (which ripping took way too long considering there wasn’t all that much of it really).

So this went from a finished project to an unfinished project that I have renewed excitement about.

I decided a variation of the last post what I want to do with this quilt, posting an EQ7 picture of what I (currently) envision the finished quilt to look like.

dancing ribbons medallion choice5

Over two different days this past week, I have tried to purchase the brighter versions of blue for the outside. I have yet to decide exactly which blues will go. The first batch all the blues were exactly the same shade.

dancing ribbons corner colors

 

 

Now I have a more varied number of blues and a different in between color. Freshly washed.

dancing ribbon fabric choices 2

 

Still living with the colors & values right now to see what I like.

On Tuesday, I spent a generous amount of time creating ‘sunshine & shadows’ (Cindy’s term) by adding crosshatch lines as background filler to the currently finished quilting project.

And a few stitches in the middle of the quilt for the yellow portions.

crosshatch quilting on negative space

Then I found this really great picture of quilting online which inspired my own version of the spade/heart shape, modifying the design of Gerri Smit to put in the corners of my original quilt to give the quilt some light pizzaz.

drawing inspired by a quilt on pintrest

I have improved some on my FMQ this past year, and 2014 is the year of FMQ, so this is very exciting to me right now!

And if you didn’t notice earlier, here are my attempts at adding pizzaz. Didn’t take many different takes at getting this right, this design I didn’t have to practice too much, and it adds so much detail to this quilt.

Dancing Ribbons Freshly quilted with Details

Today was another sewing day, but even though I have momentum on this idea, because I am still hashing out the colors in my head for the right fabric, I changed direction and did some straight line stitching all over my card trick quilt (now my oldest UFO).

Card Trick has been basted for a month or two. I chose an orange/brown color thread over the top of the card trick pieces which I think ties together the colors nicely even though none of that color even shows up on the quilt.

card trick straight quilting in orange brown thread

h1

35.2 Gimme Quilt Bling aka Make it Shiny

May 31, 2014

I have spent the greater part of today either researching free motion quilting (fmq) or actually practicing/doing free motion quilting.

Once I get onto Pinterest boards, I jump from board to board to board and see many examples of beautiful, exquisite, intricate free motion quilting designs.

Here’s mine. Depending on what date you check it, there will be more things here. Currently at 349 pins, but it’s MY fastest growing Pinterest board, so I expect to be at 500 shortly.

The more I look, the more I see that catches my eye. The more I know what I like on quilting and what I don’t.

And the more I want to quilt and free motion quilt.

A while ago I bought some shiny metallic threads. I think many of them came from Fabric Recycles. I had never metallic threads until this past month of quilting.

My soft Scrapitude started it, being so springy-springlike-pastelly.  I have been looking at my light verigated metallic thread for a while so I had to try it out.

metallicthreadonsoftscrapitude

 

This was a picture from last week, I decided this week to add to the metallic and I decided on the design to be able to do it. I don’t know that I got any other better pictures of the bling, but here is the “hopefully finished” (I will explain this qualifier in a second) Scrapitude wall hanging quilt.

scrapitude with lots of fmq

There are many different areas and quilting threads on this quilt. I had more that I had wanted to do on the outside, but for now I decided to stop.

Here’s the very center that has a storm-at-sea feeling, surrounded by vines, surrounded by orange peel types, surrounded by boxes of pearls.

center of crapitude fmq

And a close up if you centered on the box of pearls.

circularblock with vine and peas surround fmq

I added on the left side, a block that I am calling the Pea Pod block, as that is what it reminds me of – pea pods, and I like eating peas.

And there are two shiny triangles, and a vine on the top and bottom, and I found a really cool circular swirl design that I really liked for the center. The design was modified by a pantograph design that I saw online this morning. The circular swirl is also done in shiny variegated metallic, but it is hard to see the metallic flickers in this light.

I had put this quilt aside for a portion of the day, before making some final decisions about the center blocks.

And noticed a couple of things.

I am not finished with some finished quilts.

I am noticing a really nagging feeling/desire to undo-refinish two quilts.

This does not imply that I am ripping (that I know of) any more than the binding on one quilt, and maybe resewing the sleeve on the other quilt.

I can’t recall if I ever posted this little scrappy quilt before.

This is how it has been hanging on my wall for at least 5.5 months.

scrappy jewel tone quilt

 

And the quilting on it is okay, but I keep staring at it, and thinking – this quilting needs more…. Needs More…. NEEDS MORE….. NEEDS MORE!!!

See …. nagging feeling …. I have been screaming inside my head like that for a while now, but until Scrapitude and the shiny thread, I didn’t know how much this jewel toned quilt wanted bling of its own!

And granted, in the above picture, quilting isn’t easy to see, but it was verigated pinks, and pretty, and a nice pattern (something I decided on a quilting pattern like 2.5-3 years ago, but never finished the quilting until last fall today.

All this searching & quilting lead me to put in some ovals in spots and to do some metallic echo bling (name of a band, right? – here’s Metallic Echo Bling ;))

And this was requilted-overquilted-blinged up-shinier today during quilting sections of Scrapitude.

scrappy jewel bling

Here’s the center echoed out.

center bling echo

And the sides of the ocean waves more echoed. In addition to the ovals inside the arches.

metallic ocean wave echos

Only problem I forgot is that I had already attached the sleeve. So now the quilting I did today has tacked down the sleeve and will now have to be sewn down again or find another way to hang this quilt.

And I also want to take my dancing ribbons and put it on point as a medallion quilt.

Dancing Ribbons Quilt

I could leave the sashing as the light blue, but I keep thinking I need to add corners on this quilt, so I will consider ripping out the binding, repurposing it for sashing or not using it at all, and adding something lively on the corners of this quilt. Then the quilt will be bigger and I will see it more the way I want to see it.

I think the round robin is helping me think about dancing ribbons in a new way, which is VERY YAY.

But also means that now I am “attacking” two finished & bound quilts to work on – the scrappy jewel that I posted that is now blinged out, and the dancing ribbons which is back on the design wall again. Crazy.

I may even try to find some blue metallic thread. Or not. I will have to really watch the Craftsy class again about “Sewing Big Projects on a Small Machine” by Ann Peterson, as there will be the best tips to making this thing go from finished quilt, to on-point quilt center.

So now I am not sure if I am finished even when I am finished. I know “editing down” has always been my weak spot (just ask anyone who used to listen to my podcast) but I will be glad to work on this quilt again, it’s been telling me for months that it didn’t like being finished the way it was, and I am finally in a position to figure out what to do about it – in theory.

But that’s how a good experiment goes. Just when you think you’re done, a new question pops up and throws you right back into the beginning of the scientific method all over again!

h1

35.0 Month and a Half Spring 2014 Report (picture heavy)

May 18, 2014

It was never my intent to be ‘blog silent’ for a month & a half. I am starting to let the blank page intimidate me. Excuses are easier to come by now, if I don’t write now, panic may set in and another week will go by without a post.

That aside, I have had an interesting month & a half since we last spoke.

1) I got my friend’s Sunshine quilt finished.

The week I sent it off, she was away for a few weeks out of state getting treatment. I finally saw the message she left for me two weeks ago, up until now I wasn’t sure if she had gotten the quilt or not.

She said it brightened her day. Which brightened my day.

So hugs to her.

I treated the quilt to an outdoor spring tour before sending it off to her. As a symbol of some of our outdoor bike adventures to this place called Cottonmill, the mall etc.

So it went to the park bench,

DSC06632

 

And sat in the middle of the gazebo in the park,

sunshinegazebofrontquilt

And then in the prairie,

sunshinequiltprarieclose

And by a stream,

sunshinequiltbystream

And on a bridge over a stream,

sunshinequiltbridgeeast

And then it was sent away to my old friend!

2) Also missed in the last month, it was MayDay and Christmas all at once, I worked on these projects for me (the hair bows) & for the quilt boutique for the massive multi-guild show happening next June in Kansas City!

christmasstockingandmayflowers

Someone was tossing the embroidery in the trash and I decided to save it, and make a stocking pocket out of it. I hope someone will buy it.

Here’s another look at the stocking in different light.

stockingpaislychristmas

The ribbon flowers never showed up well in photographs. I am learning how to make individual petals & sew them together. I have a few more sets ready to sew, and then I sew them to a set of alligator clips I had already purchased.

3) I sent out my 1.5″ squares and I got some back!

1andahalfinchsquareswap

4) I worked on the center of my round robin quilt, going in the theme of pinks & purples.

center for round robin quilt darla

I put like everything in baggies for my next round robin partner and wrote a lot in my journal.

darlas round robin box before sending off

5) I received Daisy’s round robin center. I have already prepared a small snippet for you to see what I am heading toward. I forgot that my applique points aren’t as perfect as they could be, but this was the design I kept thinking about. As a result of on points in EQ7 and some form of block that is cut in pieces, but looks pretty cool in this context.

smallsnippetdaisy

At least I think it’s cool. It’s of a modern feel, that’s for sure. All these fabrics except the background are from my own stash and I used the focus fabric and fabrics she already had in place for the center to pick the right fabrics to add.

6) I started FMQ on my soft scrapitude. I am working in some shiny metallic thread on part of the quilting for the first time.

metallicthreadonsoftscrapitude

7) And I decided to make some orphan blocks into a table runner. I don’t have a lot of green based projects, so this was nice to work on!

greentiltbasted

So …. one and a half months of projects, 7 different types of things to work on during that time. Lots of stimulation.  A couple of bad days of panic about not posting, but if I waited much longer this list would be 5 times more. I hope you enjoy!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 607 other followers