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10.0 Home Sewing Front – Quilt as You Go – Wide Sashing Tutorial – front side

January 1, 2011

I want to thank Sandi from Quilt Cabana Corner for providing my blocks in the Quiltcast Supergroup Tilted Four Patch block swap.

She provided me with the nicest purple tilted blocks.  I was thinking … this should make an easy and quick quilt. 

The blocks have a light, dark and medium purple, all based in the red-purple family. 

I had bought the crazy purple fabric I am trying out as sashing during our trip to the International Quilt Museum in Lincoln. Same with the border (seen later)

It was a fabric I found in the bargain bin, but has both the red purple and the blue purple in flecks. 

So I am putting in corner stones of blue purple.

And working on them quilt as you go!  The first quilt-as-you-go project of mine. 

I made the back the same size as the blocks, figuring I am adding this wide sashing to each side. 

The batting sticks out an inch on each side because my finished sashing is two inches wide.

Yesterday I took my ‘New Year’s Eve holiday’ to quilt the blocks.  First Free Motion Quilting in a while.

This gave me practice on the design that is going on the hurricane quilt.  My corners got a free motion round stipple effect, which was much more fun, but much easier to start to speed up at the end.

Now the method of joining these were slightly different than Allison’s (of Within a Quarter Inch)  method of joining the blocks.  This being that the sashing still hasn’t been joined before quilting as you go.

The rest of the post is a tutorial on how I handled the wider sashing as quilt as you go.  The front side.  The back side of this quilt , I haven’t completed yet, so no pictures, but I KNOW how I want to finish it.

*********************

I am leaving the 1 inch of batting around each edge so the sashing can have some batting. 

Sashing for this quilt is 2 and a half  unfinished, 2 inches finished. 1 inch of batting from one block plus 1 inch of batting from second block should fill the 2 inch gap nicely.  If you have wider sashing, leave more batting around each block.

So I start with sewing the sashing on 1 side of the block.

DO NOT cut batting down to the edge if you want there to be batting under your sashing.

Now to join the other completely quilted quilt block.  Open the sashing.  Flip this piece upside down.  Put the other quilt block on the bottom and line up the raw sashing edge with the new quilt block edge.

Sew it, and open. Press.  DO NOT cut batting down to the edge if you want there to be batting under your sashing. If you have over lap, go ahead and trim pu the batting so that it lays flat and butts up together.

Here is the front (actually picture taken before I pressed).

Sew the next sashing to the corner-stone (if you have one), pin it to one side of the double block. Sew.

Be careful.  Even with a walking foot, I found the bottom more tightly sewn than the top.

The single piece of fabric on the top always seemed to have a harder time easing into the seam.  So I had to hide the extra seam fabric in the corner-stone.  This was lining up before I started sewing, but by the middle, my bottom fabric sandwich was much farther along in the machine than my top fabric. Pins helped, but did not prevent this. 

Has to do with either my walking foot, or the extra layers, or both.  I have suspected similar type problems with my walking foot when working on the bag, but perhaps this is natural?

We’ll repeat the process of flipping this set of 2 blocks over, and sewing the raw edge seam onto another group of two blocks (also pinned – pins not  shown below).

At this time, I have the quilt as you go done on this point.  I am working on the outside sashing and cornerstones.

I also have to quilt as you go my border fabric, which is just adorable.  Or adorabibble as my friend says (she bought the same fabric on the same trip, unbeknownst to me).

First I have to go cut more batting down to size.  I do have the borders size predetermined, and the outer sashing and corner stones will provide me a way to connect the inner quilt with the borders.

To complete the back, I have sashing that is the same size (no corner stones) and I am going to fold over a quarter inch on each edge and top stitch it onto the quilt.  Like an extra wide bias tape. 

However, I MAY have to make the sashing just about a quarter – half inch wider just to handle some variations in my fold as I am going along.  But I suspect the current sashing is going to be adequate.

I should be able to update in a couple of days once I make sure I have figured out all the kinks in doing borders on quilt as you go.  If so, consider this post a ‘part 1’ as it were.

… to the “quick and easy quilt” thought I had earlier … DOH! 

I know better. 

This coulda been much quicker and easier if I wasn’t trying out a new technique.  But look what I have had a chance to share with you?!  So no loss there.

 Happy New year everyone, let’s keep experimenting!

11 comments

  1. I like your tutorial. Thanks for sharing. The free motion quilting in each of the blocks is so beautiful. I am going to bookmark this page so I can come back to it.


  2. This looks like an interesting project. I like the technique I even like the wide borders…. which previously I have always thought made a project look clunky/ very retro… but your sample looks pretty good and I think it will make a nice quilt when done… I can not wait till you post the completed project.


  3. I love this tutorial. Thanks for sharing.


  4. Great job, Darla. I’m going to try one of these quilt as you go wall hangings this year—a quilt resolution! jill


  5. […] few days ago, I went out to buy ‘batting off a roll’ for my Quilt as you Go project and off I ran to a fabric store […]


  6. Thanks for the tutorial. I always wondered how to do wide sashing!


  7. have you tried using the backing cut larger than the batting as the sashing?


    • That would have been a better idea than what I did. I’ll consider it next time. 🙂


      • Has any one else tried this. I am thinking of doing this. In theory it should work. . I intend to join the blocks ( batting larger than tops and backing larger than batting) back sides together sewing in line with the edge of the batting. this wool leave extra backing sticking up onto the top of the quilt. This would then be pressed open, the edge tucked under and top stitched to front of the blocks neatly hiding all the raw edges and securing the layers together. Do you think this would work?


      • So are you considering bringing your backing fabric to the front of the quilt to become the sashing on the front side? This sounds like it would be harder to do. What I never finished on my tutorial is that I had to hand stitch the wide sashing on the back on one of the edges so that it would hide my stitches. I’m trying to picture the way you’re describing this, and it seems that if the edges on the front side you wanted to be ok would have to be rolled under a few times and then top stitched down. Which sounds almost harder to me, but I think I know where you’re going with it. But that would eliminate the idea of the hand stitching because now the top stitch would be on the quilt front and thus part of the quilt design. Something to try maybe?


      • I’ll do a trial and let you know. thanks



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