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36.0 Tricord Ribbons Dancing around the Corner

August 24, 2014

This quilt I decided to remake. If you are a regular follower of my blog (and previous podcast) you may have heard / seen this quilt before.

I am getting really close to being done with this quilt, now is all the handwork portion of the quilt left. The steps I still have left for this quilt are: one side of binding, hand tacking the sleeve to the back, sewing the label to the back, sewing the beads on at the appropriate parts.

I took the quilt outside today and pretended that all four binding sections were sewn down.

Ribbons Dancing in the Corners

Let me back up a little bit and show you some process. Since I am a process girl.

Last picture you have seen (according to my notes) was just before the completed corners were sewn onto the quilt. Well yes, you saw it sewn down with the batting and all, but there were some skipped steps on that silent sunday.

I took apart this quilt, ripped off the binding, sewed together the paper pieced corners with the gold diamonds in the corners.

Then I sewed the sashing directly onto the corners, I oversewed on the edges, figuring it would all square up at a later time. Probably dangerous to my final project, but in the end it worked.

one corner with sashing

I don’t know that I recommend this method for other people, it very much uses the “fly by the seat of your pants” method of sew it bigger and then chop it down later instead of accurate measuring and calculating.

And I repeated this for all four corners.

I found the center of my corner blocks and the center of my quilt edge – see the pins on the right and left, those are center – centering pins to help me line up.

laying both corners on the quilt

As you can see, I decided to do right/left at the same time, it made sense to me at the time.

The technique is from Ann Peterson’s Craftsy class. I did do it on the diagonal instead of as a border that follows straight. I just attached triangles instead of rectangles to the sides.

And Ann Peterson did not necessarily address sashing, but again, I just attached it to the corners first.

And before these got sewn down, I put the backing and then batting on the back side of the quilt.

after backing batting goes next

This image is of the quilt flipped over, the hibiscus Hawaiian print is the original backing, and the blue swirl fabric is right sides together laying on top, with the batting on the very back of the quilt.

So the sandwich goes from top to bottom:

  1. Front paper pieced corner with attached sashing, good side facing the original quilt sandwich
  2. The first (original) quilt sandwich
  3. The new corner backing, good side facing the original quilt sandwich
  4. The corner-shaped batting

sewing first corners on

And then after sewing the first two corners, I had to take a TV break.

This was the boring part so I don’t have any pictures of it.

I had to take my scissors and trim out all the batting. At this stage, there are two layers of batting on the right side of the seam I sewed above.

  1. The layer between the original quilt sandwich, the very original batting
  2. The very outside batting – the one that we put on the very back

So with large ginger scissors and some new Havel small scissors that are becoming my favorites. They have long handles, a curve, and I feel comfortable cutting close to the fabric with these.

havel 4 inch long handled angled scissors

I can’t remember which pair I ordered and I can’t find the email, but these are really nice scissors. I also bought a shorter curved blade seam ripper which I also like, but not as much as these scissors.

…. Anyway ….

These scissors helped me to remove the batting from in between the two pieces of fabric on the seam allowance side of the seam. Removing the inside batting is such a pain in the tuckus, but getting this out before sewing down the other two corners was helpful. TV was definitely involved somehow as a distraction mechanism.

And then good good pressing! As much as I could press out. Even with the removing of the batting, and the pressing, if you look closely, you can still see sort of a bulge.

Then I repeated the process with the other two corners.

pinning down second set of corners

And, even with as careful as I was to line up the centers, I was a little bit off. For some reason, even with my walking foot, I find the top fabric always shifts lower than the sandwich part on the bottom. If I thought it was the foot and not the user, I would get another walking foot and see where the error is, but geesh walking feet are a little pricy.

And then I showed off my non quilted corners on twitter and the like.

dancing ribbons tricord medallion with corners

And then I found this amazing dahlia line drawing online when I was searching for FMQ designs. This is supposed to be a coloring page for 4th of July, but this is absolutely perfect for my quilt. Link following to my pinterest page on it.

And I did the blowing up the design by like 200% and tape it together, and then sew holes in the punched out pattern, and then use the pounce to transfer the generic grid of the dahlia to the quilt itself.

I forgot pictures of this part during the weekend I did all that.

And then quilted the dahlia, and did echo circles of all three colors on the corner quilting and left some negative unquilted spaces between.

corner quilting showing up on the back of the quilt

And during the week that Robin Williams died, I listened to a podcast and quilted the last rows outside the dahlia. Good way to get out grief and confusion to quilt something.

The best picture of my quilting I took today. (It is still not that great of picture, actually).

quilting corner tricord colors

The inner circle is the pink, the middle circle is the turquoise, and the outer circle is the purple.

And then I had the perfect color binding already picked out, and I mimicked my original piping idea with a very small kicker / flange type of thing. I cut four 1 inch strips, folded them together lengthwise, wrong sides together, and then stuck them directly underneath my binding that I attached from the front (to hand bind).

adding yellow flange binding

I have done flanges under several borders of my quilt, and let me tell you that 1 inch was just perfect in the right amount of color just popping out for this quilt. I love the affect it gives.

I didn’t know I didn’t like piping until I took the piping out of the original quilt. I am glad I put it back together without the cord inside. Maybe that was user-error?? Anyway, I like it now.

What’s left?

  • The one side hand bound,
  • tacking down the sleeve,
  • recreating the label,
  • adding new and old label to the quilt,
  • hand sewing beads to the corners of the new quilting design.

I almost wonder what hot-fix crystals would look like on this quilt? I wonder if this is the quilt where I find out how to do them?

Right now I am VERY glad I spent the time recreating this quilt. It was a good quilt before, and I think I bumped it up a couple of levels with all the new stuff I did to the quilt.

So yes, done is better than perfect, BUT ….

Sometimes “perfect” is more satisfying in the end. I will be glad to be able to hang this quilt up on the wall again!

Maybe I will even enter it into the regional show we’re having next June. But we don’t get much space for guild quilts, so if my guild mates don’t chose it, I will have to try to get it judged.  I really want to enter a different quilt for the regional show however, the red & black kings puzzle quilt.

But first the borders. And the boutique items, and the “ghost bunnies” for the NICU kids, and the round robin projects. And quilting and binding and other things!

5 comments

  1. Great post, Darla. You explained your process succinctly. It must have taken a ton of thought and calculations. You are amazing.

    Unfortunately, i didn’t have such success with my recent adventures with math. I added instead subtracted seam allowances (or was it the other way around?). Oh well, I think I figured out how to make it work!

    Your “Dancing Ribbons” is amazing. Thank you for sharing your genius. Tami

    Sent from Tami Knox (aka Nana) iPhone

    >


    • Tami, not to toot my own horn, but I did the finishing touches on my portion of your quilt today. I am very proud of what I did on that quilt, and oh boy there were a lot of pieces, but in the end, I really, really like how it turned out. Funny, but after I put in the correct measurements in EQ7, I didn’t feel like I did many calculations at all on this part of my Dancing Ribbons quilt. 😉


  2. Terrific result, Darla! I liked this quilt before, but you really have kicked it up. Wonderful qyuilting design!


  3. Wow. I love how it looks and I get the whole, take it apart and redo and overdo and add extra and cut down and make it work thing. Whatever works. I hope to get to see it in person. 🙂


  4. […] they’re closed Mon & Tues. So I decided to take a quilting pattern, one I quilted on the Dancing Ribbons quilt with corners to put on either the […]



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