Archive for the ‘EQ7’ Category

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42.0 Designing a quilt for the guild

November 10, 2017

Every other year our guild is making an opportunity quilt – sorta like a raffle quilt – for the guild. Our current one will be drawn for in a few more weeks.

Here is our current guild opportunity quilt that is just about out the door!

We used Tula Pink’s Modern quilt blocks in greys and blues. Bordered in green to help get the blocks to the correct size, and then grey sashing with subtly darker cornerstones. We were making these blocks from our own guild’s stash, and it turned out great because there is such variety in the colors used.

We did this with expressed permission from Tula Pink, and specific instructions for guild members with the patterns involved. Which makes sense for the designer to protect their own copyright.

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Somehow for the next opportunity quilt, we were having a guild discussion and, sorta because I through out a question or two, I sorta attached my name out there for designing/picking the next one we do as a guild.

We won’t have to have the quilt fully made until like January or February of 2019, but I am trying to think early, think ahead on this.

Something about this project was nagging me. I spent a good chunk of time looking through quilt block books, scrap quilt books, this year.

I have been spending time flipping through my quilt-block calendar.

I usually flip through this and leave it up on a block that I would like to make, like the one in the picture above.

I went through lots of designs on electric quilt 7 and just spent time thinking and thinking and planning and planning.

I printed out several different types of quilts that would be fun to do.

I had some time away from my computer and away from Electric quilt. During the times I was away, I used my book of 1000 quilt blocks, and my calendar and started sketching by hand on my moleskin, and used my good coloring pencils for some design inspirations.

A few days I couldn’t find my moleskin and I used this sketchbook to get a generic idea for other blocks.

As you can see, I like the grid work already done, everything is much better attended to.

Something about this block drawing and coloring is very soothing.

I think some of these would be nice to add into Electric Quilt and then explore some other color ranges.

I also think I zeroed in on some designs that won’t work well with a mixed group, but will work better as a non-scrappy quilt, that I am saving for myself. Tell me a better way to start and desire to make many many more quilt starts?!

I was attempting to figure out what blocks would be interesting enough that one would want to purchase a chance at, but also easy enough to have people work towards the quilt together, that will work as things with their stash.

I kept coming back to a quilt design that I had done a while ago. That I had altered a while ago. A quilt block called Aunt Sukey’s Choice.

Over and over, I saw this design and kept thinking it would work!

I was able to make one block for the quilt, and I even showed it off to the guild. A guild member had a good suggestion about the middle portion being one piece instead of four smaller pieces and reworking the white sections nearby. I like this idea and it will help simplify the quilt a bit.

I tend to work in “cool color pallets” or “warm color pallets” when doing scrappy quilts.

I ended up reworking this quilt a little bit after showing it off to the guild. The one I had shown to the guild was just blue and green alternating. I was leaning towards cool colors anyway.

But If I think of this quilt block as a sort of “nine patch”, the half square triangle sections could look just as good in reverse as they do pointed out. And alternating reverse blocks with non reverse blocks would be good design in and out and have a good direction to the the quilt.

So this is my rework of this design, which, for the moment, I am calling Sukey’s Reverse.

I am going to write up directions to the quilt, This is the same block but with different colors and a reverse section next to a non-reverse section. Nothing harder than what was already done.

I am giving myself the option to use a small amount of sashing that could fit in between blocks with dark blue cornerstones if the quilt blocks are not squared up correctly.

A suggestion has been to get members to upsize the blocks and then cut down to the correct size before putting together. Also we could assign the half square triangle blocks to someone, and the four patch blocks to someone, and we could cover the various amounts of skill needed for the quilt.

If we’re smart, we can do this out of our stash.

I kept getting told to use a block or pattern that was either free or get permission to buy the book. And depending on my pattern writing skills, my guild members may ALL agree in the end. But this is what I wanted to do from the outset, take something familiar and then make something new with it.

If this pattern is already out there and possibly popular, please let me know, but this was something I truly created from a block pattern and a good design program. I am liking the blues on all the outside blocks, and the other colors on all the inside blocks I think this will ground the quilt but also have a nice variety of colors and interest and fabrics!

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41.9 Medallion Dreams in the Summer

November 3, 2017

As you might have seen I have a few other things on the design wall I stared at this summer. Some of these are inspired by the round robins I was part of a few years ago, and yes, I still love my round robin quilt and it’s my most cherished quilt ever, even though it’s taking a break currently waiting to be sure that no more water is coming down the ceiling from it’s normal place.

Here’s an old picture of my round robin quilt before it was quilted. But this will give you an idea what we are talking about with round robin and medallion quilts.

I made a post about How Round Robins work, with that post being the center of a trading round robin & medallion quilt parts and pieces, and here was the final picture of all the other round robins that we did that year. Some of the pictures below I was part of early, some was part of at the end. Very high levels of creativity!

For this year, I decided to make at least 3 medallion quilts from the starts I have here. These will sorta follow the round robin rules, but I don’t have any other quilters to trade with for these. So whatever I turn out will be my own round robin creativity. Which is the fun part.

First medallion

I had a left over block from my blue and red and purple cathedral windows type quilt. I decided to make it into a medallion quilt. Here’s an old picture of the quilt. I use it all the time, nice lap sized quilt!

I have the block bordered and was originally thinking pillow, but why not just make it the center of a new quilt?

I am thinking something like this would be a nice finish for my first medallion quilt of the summer. Some of the design is inspired by the wrought iron fences from one of the quilt vendors I saw. And yes I also want to make some form of wrought iron fence applique quilt. This is just the design from the base blocks in EQ7 from the block library.

I still haven’t yet completely committed on this first medallion quilt, This might be the last round, but I am currently stuck on the “second round”. I do like what I have here, but in thinking of fabrics that will go with this, I am not exceedingly sure. Which might be telling me to make some sort of change to this second round. I think I like the 3rd round good, even though it’s a combo of the applique pieces provided by electric quilt designers.

The first medallion quilt I have not decided any fabrics beyond what has already been done.

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Second medallion

The second block I want to also medallion / round robin quilt, I have all the fabrics for it, but haven’t settled on a design yet for the second round, but I have some basics started. This center I got from the guild show last year 2016 as either someone else’s unfinished top/block/medallion.

I wasn’t the only one who saw it and liked it, I am intrigued by the fact that someone didn’t just finish this little joy as is, but for me, I am thinking, we need to do something nice to this and make it the center of attention. The nice coral and yellow blocs are pretty small.

I have been collecting fabrics to match this medallion already.

Some of the fabrics I have also include some bonus pieces from my Arkansas Crossroads Quilt.

I keep bringing the half square triangles (the things in the lumps on the right) to various sewing days and other things to trim them down but every time I get them out to sew with, I decide to work on something else. I am thinking these pieces will either have to be an outer round, or I will have to double and triple them up in an earlier round. Here’s the start of playing in electric quilt 7 with this quilt. I am not totally sold on the design yet, but it’s a start. I found these blocks interesting to work with. Probably too much yellow, but don’t worry, I will adjust or switch.

Third medallion

A third block I also have had for a while is this dark blue with red flower block.

This block I had purchased at the fabric recycles place and I thought it would be fun to challenge myself to making something new with it.

I actually was the one who put the orange border on the quilt block already. This quilt I was going to try to “medallion up” at home at the same time as working on the other medallions of the round robin quilts. Little did I know how much I was putting into their designs and how much that would take.

At that time, I picked out most of these fabrics, but not yet designs.

I haven’t worked a lot with the red orange yellow pallet and I am liking the start of this one too. I need to recreate this one in electric quilt and see if I can spark something already. Maybe this one needs to be multiple medallions on point settings since I haven’t done too many of those yet. I think I may start with that idea and see where it goes.

An update to Electric Quilt 7 just came out – EQ8 – and I purchased it! Looking forward to using it instead to push these designs forward!

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38.3 Scrap Sewing more of the same

September 13, 2015

Hey all! I have been trying a few things, but today during my day off I have gotten more done of the same quilts I have been working on.

First I am working on adding more corners to the Winslow Corners quilt. I have 5 more blocks of pieces done of the corner pieces, but not trimmed up & sewn together yet.

wpid-20150913_123337.jpg

Trying to decide on this quilt size. Most likely this will be another throw quilt. Looking forward to trying something cool in the light grey section for the actual quilting of these blocks!

I also have to go back to EQ and print/create the border blocks which finish up the corner pattern.

I am finding it a nice way to use my scraps.

I may look at other patterns that have 16 patch blocks in them. I have been thinking about sashing them in colors or black and setting a different alternating block with them.

I have also been doing more of the same scrap quilting with Shoo Fly blocks.

wpid-20150913_154727.jpg

I have one more block hanging out on the sewing machine, and i have pieces for many more blocks, maybe another 15 – 20 blocks already done.

It makes it easier to get started sewing when I know the decision has been made and the prepwork has been done on these blocks.

I do want to do a disappearing Shoo Fly block quilt. I am now not certain THIS is the quilt to do that to, considering each of these 9 patch blocks are only 3″. To cut them down and resew them I would lose several inches and it might not be big enough to appreciate the design. Or the time it will take to cut apart and resew these blocks.

I haven’t decided yes or no on that yet. Still making the pre-made shoo fly blocks.

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I did sort all my pieces of scraps by color for 1.5″ blocks in anticipation of a potential swap in the future. I also have sorta swapped with someone some of these 1.5″ blocks.

And I may have signed up for a hashtag swap for the secret Facebook group “Twilters!” Due in October. I have a lot of random strings that may make nice hashtag pieces.

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I am leaning towards taking apart my quilting on the Samurai Sudoku quilt that is so off kilter on the quilting. I currently only have 3 hours of quilting into the top and its about a 1/4 way quilted.

I have to set up an appointment to go back to the long arm quilting place in October and I have been hemming & hawing trying to decide to take out stitches or not. The thing is pretty wonky, which causes me to be uncertain I would like it if I continued quilting as I have been.

Knowing me, I would worry & about it if I didn’t fix it. I have told myself it is practice. But I want it to be better practice than this.

But it is so much work to do and then I have to go redo all the quilting on it already.

upclose picture of samurai sudoku quilt on longarm

So mostly more of the same quilting as the last month. I someday will go back to other UFO’s I think.

Debating on weather or not to do Scrapitude this year. I don’t really like the timing of it (early in the year or maybe it’s late near the holiday season). I haven’t decided. Seems like a few things going on now. And then I have been doing these “new projects” such as Winslow Corners quilt.

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As I was cleaning my sewing room, I found Winding Ways small scrappy quilt blocks that I swapped with the swap group I was in. We used the Accuquilt cutter to cut random batiks, and I don’t mind sewing the blocks together yet.

For yet another donation/extra scrappy quilt.

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Jack’s Chain

I have decided I would like to attempt a Jack’s chain quilt for the next big Regional quilt Festival here, in 2017. Might be more than I can chew in just under 2 years. But these 1.5 inch pieces could be useful for that.

First I need to figure out how to make EQ7 do what I want. I posted on an EQ7 FB group and got some good advice, but still am stuck, since the copy paste instructions I got somehow aren’t pasting correctly doing it the way that it was suggested to me. I don’t think the instructions are wrong, but I do know it’s not doing what I want it to do, so maybe a different route will be necessary. Or maybe I have to click somewhere else first. EQ7 is picky like that.

I have a vision or actually several ideas for the quilt. But need an EQ7 color guide for me to be successful at it!

We will see if I change my mind before the event. I have had a few months of batting the idea around already and so I know it will be one I will like to try to put into that show. Very time consuming quilt, depending on size.

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37.6 How Round Robins Work

May 23, 2015

This is a post describing how round robins work, or rather, how our round robin worked, complete with pictures.

If you missed a while on the blog or were redirected here from elsewhere, I was included in a multi-group internet friends (twilter-twitter quilter friend) round robin quilt exchange.

One fantastic lady, Daisy of Lazy Daisy Quilts decided to put together a round robin quilt exchange and asked for signups from interested people back at the beginning of 2014.

There were enough ladies who wanted to participate that we had 3 groups: Twilter Round Robin Group A, Twilter Round Robin Group B, Twilter Round Robin Group C. Our group was Group A

Basic Definition of a Round Robin quilt exchange:

Round Robin quilts are long-term projects in which each person works on other peoples’ projects during the time of the round robin, passing along a quilt idea, fabric, and a rapidly growing partial quilt top to each participant until the quilt ends back in the original quilter’s possession.

For me, it all started off with a pattern from electric quilt, a fabric choice & then a block.

center for round robin quilt darla

Here’s the first question I am asked when talking about the round robin: How does it work?

Generally, a round robin quilt (as our group did it) is an agreement between friends or strangers and friends to work on a quilt of someone else’s with the understanding that they will work on yours in return.

My role in the round robin:

  1. I made the center of the quilt. I decided what colors to be used & original quilt direction.
  2. I selected fabrics for the quilt to use in the quilt.
  3. I provide some kind of guidelines or suggestions to the others in the group for working on the quilt.
  4. I send the quilt onto the next person in the list (in the mail or in person). I am always sending to the same next person.
  5. I receive someone else’s quilt in the mail, with their center (or more), their fabrics, their instructions. I am always receiving a quilt from the same previous person.
  6. I work through an appropriate design to add a border to the outside of the quilt. Using math, graph paper, books or websites for inspiration, sometimes electronic quilt blocks or suggestion from Electric Quilt 7 (EQ7).
  7. I follow general guidelines by the round robin coordinator for each round to help spur imagination or direct the appropriate design. Not to be used religiously with all quilts in all situations, but to help stretch each quilter, and attempt to provide harmony with the finished project.
  8. I finish my section of the new border, sometimes making changes due to size restrictions, or fabric shortages which happens because we’re not always great at figuring out in advance what fabrics others would be appealing to the general design or just underestimation. Sometimes this step also requires purchasing fabric of our own.
  9. I write down something interesting in the process in the quilt journal. (optional) I write my name on a label provided by the original quilter (optional, but fantastically helpful in the end).
  10. I send the quilt top with my new border to the same next person in line.
  11. Receive the new quilt, repeat steps 5-10 until the original quilt comes back. I have a full quilt top and a full label and journal.

Twilter Round Robin Group A final collage

 

The coordinator has a lot of decisions to make before getting the round robin started.

The round robin coordinator’s role:

  1. They decide the groups (if more than 6 want to be part of the round robin) 5-6 people seem to be a good match for this round robin.
  2. They create a deadline for each border swap.
  3. The estimate the approximate amount of each type of fabric needed to make the quilt work, suggest the amount of background fabric, focus fabric, and other fabric to be used in making of a quilt top.
  4. The estimate the sizes of each of the borders to be proportional to the space on the quilt.
  5. They create general guidelines to help direct the future quiltmakers down a path to help create a good quilt and/or to ask people to work out of their own comfort zones.
  6. They coordinate the addresses and order of each person to do the round robin.
  7. They answer general questions, help figure out if deadlines need adjusted.
  8. They type up all the info and get it to the participants. Follow up if needed in some areas. Perhaps some handholding or drama-gathering if needed in some groups.
  9. Remind us it’s all fun.

Round Robin Twilter Group A

As you can see above, we had 6 different quilts with 6 different personalities and styles.

How does the passing of the quilts work?

Because we had a round that we passed quilts on to each other, and each person was in a different order, we were able to affect each quilt at a different stage of its development.

  • The first two quilts each of us received, we were only beginning to shape the look and feel of the quilt to follow.
  • The next round brought the middle into focus, the meat of the quilt,
  • The last two rounds were on the finishing side of the round, these were larger & took up more time & fabric.

Our round went like this:

Daisy passes to me, I pass to Diane, Diane pass to Laura, Laura pass to Tami, Tami pass to Tina, Tina pass to Daisy.

twilter round robin how the quilts got passed in a round

And each of us had our own version of that. The drawing above shows how the quilts were passed around.

My role in the round robin Group A, and the quilts as I saw them in the order I worked on them

Round 1 – Daisy

Since Daisy’s was the first round robin quilt I saw, it was the first one I worked on, and thus the smallest round to do.

This is a collage of the completed quilt of Daisy’s (on the left), the block as I received it, and the block as I finished it.

daisys finished quilt center and my portion

Once completed, I wrote in the journal, and on the label, then sent it in the mail to Diane.

Once Daisy was finished with the next quilt – Tina’s quilt, she sent it in the mail to me. As you will see I was always receiving from Daisy and sending to Diane. So I really only had to have 1 address.

Round 2 – Tina

Tina’s quilt only had her center and Daisy’s first border. The sky was the limit here.

tinas finished quilt center and my portion

The picture above is Tina’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 3 – Tami

At the “halfway point” everyone was working on the opposite person’s quilt. I was working on Tami’s quilt when she was working on mine.

tamis finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Tami’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 4 – Laura

Laura’s quilt was based on neutral fabrics. Greys and browns dominated the landscape of this quilt top with dramatic golds and blue hues thrown in for a smidge of color

lauras finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Laura’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 5 – Diane

Diane’s quilt was mostly done. I was trying to figure out an appropriate finish for her quilt.

dianes finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Diane’s finished quilt on the left. Which is also the portion that I worked on and sent out to her. Top right is the original block, bottom right is the quilt top as I received it.

More notes about Round Robin Quilts & observations

Since it was a center-focused round robin where we added further borders to the outside of an already ‘finished’ project, so the projects usually take on a medallion feeling.

Each quilter has to essentially be a “border designer”, and has to be willing to either ‘do the math’ or make a program (like EQ7) do the math for them.

I used inspiration from either drawing graph paper, or Electric Quilt 7, or a book on borders, or pinterest pictures, or various books on techniques. Sometimes I tried several different versions of the quilt, but once I kept seeing one version in my mind more than 1 day, that is the variation I went with.

There is an option to do rows instead of medallion rounds, which would be the same amount of work on the last one as on the first one. This would work in a similar way, but are usually called “Row Robin” quilts instead.

The first round we received, we had a shortened timeframe, but we had less size to finish before sending it off. This was stressful for me, but I did get the quilt done by or close to the deadline most of the time.

Each swap we had different goals, different color pallets, different visions to try to work into the quilts. It is truly a good way to sew out of the comfort zone.

And since the twilters who were interested in this swap were all over the US, the boxes got some post office traveling time around the country.

Some of the early quilts I worked on, I was completely surprised with at the end.

We got to learn about each person as reading through the journal entries of the original quiltmaker, in addition to things other people said in the journal. I was inspired by things in the journal in addition to other blocks and items I saw elsewhere. Many times the journal dictated the “tone” of the quilt more than anything!

Math was very helpful in the round robin. Having the original dimensions of each quilt, then trying to figure out how to put blocks together with appropriate spacers was challenging, but a heck of a lot of fun.

It helped me to use a program like EQ7 to help with the math and to visually see if the blocks I were doing were too big or not big enough or if I needed to add spacers.

Often times, I used my moleskin graph paper the most as it was the perfect thing to visually count other parts of the quilt.

Another note was to not try to overshadow the other people’s work. Since I try to do “big bold complicated” this was a constant worry for me, and something that at times reigned me in, and other times I probably ignored. Looking back, I ended up adding a darker border many times to the quilts I received. I don’t know if/what that says about me.

The most important part is to leave a part of yourself in the quilt that you’re working on. Being true to who I am is very important to me, even if I don’t always know what that looks like. So even during the “potential overshadows” I may/maynot have done, I still made quilts that were pleasing to me, that were something that I could do as well as I could.

That’s what matters & that is what’s special about these quilts.

In summary (visual)

The quilts as I worked on them, the center block, what I did to them, and their final product.

Round Robin Progress

Yay for round robins with friends!

 

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36.9 Weave On took over March-A-Long

March 10, 2015

I am not certain how or why, but possibly when I was doing the ceramics last week on my day off, I woke up the following day with a solution to a 4 year old problem. Well probably a 2 year old quilting problem.

weave border top completed with weaved borders

Four years ago, I, on a whim, made a quilt with 3 main colors, blue, red & yellow. I improvised a pattern that I saw online, but I couldn’t have told you who or what then, all I know is I made what I called a Weave quilt.

Then I came up with a variation on borders that I have seen several places that involved paper piecing & bias tape. I made lots of these border blocks using 3 fabrics for the borders that I also bought on a whim.

It turned out that I didn’t plan ahead on borders, I was originally when I bought the fabric, thinking I would do inner, middle & outer border in plain sizes.

This often happens, I was starting to run out of red fabric in the borders, but I wasn’t all the way around the whole quilt.

So then I decided to well, stop making the weave borders that I had planned & already started. And then I needed to come up with a clever end to this pattern, this quilt.

That was 2 years ago. I am certain I talked of this quilt before on this blog before at least once or twice.

Any event, the ephiphany happened and now I suddenly gotten taken over by this quilt, a desire to finish it before guild (tonight) pushed aside plans on both Sunday and today (my day off this week instead of Saturday).

It still took a good chunk of time on Sunday, and I did some unsewing of blocks once I figured on size, and measuring, and drawing what to do both on paper & EQ7.

weaved ends close up borders

I had figured out the two corner blocks a while ago, but hadn’t made them.

connected corner on border

The ends are little applique circles of the fabric I had stored with this quilt.

Circular ends

The biggest compromise I had to make with myself is not floating the border in blue fabric. I still wish I could have done it that way, but I completely didn’t have enough of the same blue, and I do like that the red just trounces off the edge of the quilt while the yellow stays connected.

Wow it feels great to get this done. My March-A-Long which I was only going to work for 15 minutes turned out to be another full weekend of mostly quilting. That is both good and bad.

I could feel an urge to get this done before the guild, to finish it off before my mind was tired of working on it. It really only needed the bordered finished and then attached.

More borders, who would have thought? I wonder if any more quilts only need borders on them? I could get a lot of these UFO’s to the next stages.

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32.8 Preparing for Quilting Retreat

November 6, 2013

Hey all!

I have been busy on the weekends preparing for my now ‘annual’ Arkansas quilting retreat. With an online swap group that doesn’t really talk anymore, and doesn’t really swap anymore either.

But the ladies have been coming for many years and now I have been coming since 2010.

A little sad because the fall’s fearless leader passed away late last fall/winter.  And it will be hard to imagine the retreat w/o her spirit.

But also happy to reconnect with some of the other quilters I have gotten to know over the years.

To prepare I made my own style of pincushion & thread catcher bag.

DSC05440

This doesn’t have stabilizer like I had planned, but oh well it’s just a pincushion bag.

The pincushion is an offset square pincushion.

DSC05442

The name for the pincushion shape is Biscornu and is traditionally done with pretty embroidery/cross stitch patterns on the top.

I used two 5 inch offset squares  to make the pincushion. I stuffed it with walnut shells.

Then went searching around all of creation (aka Kansas city quilt/fabric shops) for the perfect button for the top. I think the resulting button is from Joanns, the last place on my list that day.

I used the tutorial from Merriment Design for the basic bag, self modifying the size of the liner material & outside bag, in addition to adding the Velcro strip to the bag and base.

The base is actually a small square of wood, covered with batting, sewn with a cover (also made with two 5 inch squares).

This would work a tiny bit better with stiff stablilizer sewn just under the top rim of the outside lining.

The Biscornu pincushion sits on the top and provides the weight for the combo even though the actual pincushion is not attached.

***

Retreat plans (pre-retreat)

For retreat I am going to start ‘two’ new quilts. One I wanted to try to start last year but didn’t like the color values / amount of fabric I had for the color. I am going to retry to start this project up again.

I also am planning to sew the final quilt top together on the hexadaisy plus quilt, the larger, slightly modified version of the small hexadaisy quilt I started this spring.

I have two bindings to attach, one from the strip twist swap blocks from way back in 2010 or so.

DSC05311

 

This was my first long arm quilt that I only got 3/4 of the way through, and as you can see ‘ol’ blue worked its way to finish the rest of the quilt.

The last section of quilting is not exactly to my liking or standard of the long arm stuff, but at least it is done & just needs a binding.

And a few blocks here & there to work on as leaders / enders – a black version & a white based version.

I had desires to make a twister block pattern I purchased this year, but didn’t have enough fabric for the quilt I wanted to make, even the special dyed fabric I bought for it.

So that fabric will be repurposed and some other time I will make the twister block quilt.

But then this morning (hours before retreat mind you) I was trolling around my own pinterest board this morning & came up with a new variation of a design I have been wanting to do since 2010, a God’s Eye quilt.

Quilters cache has detailed instructions for doing a 20″ God’s Eye block. I had seen the block done w/ HST’s in my 1000 quilt blocks book a long time ago.

So a short time later in EQ7, I created the god’s eye (didn’t see it in the library) & a good alternate block.

godseyeandmixedfourpatches

If the quilt works out, I’ll consider writing up a pattern for this with HST’s.

The God’s Eye block has a lot of parts to it, but I like it. I know it reminds me of the trumpet block for my Exothermic wonders quilt, but I love the play of these two block sets together.

And with that, I have to commence packing. What’s left is all the extra parts I will need to create these wonderful quilts.

Glad I was able to create the idea for something new.

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25.1 SQ Ep 041 – Samurai Sudoku Quilt

April 22, 2012

Podcast Feed

Classic Sudoku and Quilts

You ever heard of a Sudoku quilt before?

Sudoku is a puzzle game, much in the style of magic square type of math game.

Each section of the Sudoku puzzle is it’s own little nine patch, (a 3 x 3 grid) with each box of the nine patch has a number from 1 to 9 in it.

There are traditionally nine sections in a Sudoku puzzle, each section is laid out in it’s own nine patch box. A 3 x 3 grid of sections.

Traditionally, the rule for the puzzle is as follows.

Each box in each section has a number 1-9, with no repeats.

Each box in each row (of three sections) has a number 1-9, with no repeats.

Each box in each column (of three sections) has a number 1-9, with no repeats.

Here is a picture of a printed Sudoku puzzle that is not filled out.

You can easily see the shape of the traditional (classic) sudoku pattern as a series of three nine patch blocks in three rows. A nine patch of nine patches. (fractal for those of us math nerds)

You can see some designs in how and which numbers are included with the puzzle as well.

Well, a while ago, some quilter got it in his/her head that we could use these puzzles easily in quilts. Quilts are squares, Sudoku puzzles are squares, nine patches look like Sudoku boxes.

And I’ve seen a couple of people use fabric or colors to symbolize each number.

If each of the numbers is represented by a specific color OR a specific fabric, then this turns into a very easy (just have a design wall) quilt to make. Straight stitches, nine patches. You can include sashing around the nine patches to signify the darker lines.

This quilt takes 9 of the same colors or fabrics, so you may be able to use 9 fat quarters or 9 fat eights to complete depending on the size of the quilt you want to make.

And you should be able to find Sudoku quilt patterns to purchase if you do not want to actually do the puzzle yourself. Or ask your kids (or other recipient) to do the puzzle and then give it back to you completed, and then you make a surprise quilt, including the picture of the original puzzle on the back.

Sudoku Quilt Variations Using Classic Sudoku Patterns

If you wanted to be a little different, what about setting the Sudoku quilt patches in attic windows to designate the quilt blocks?

Don’t want to do the whole puzzle? Just make the starting numbers and leave the rest blank!

Or go ahead and give them the actual numbers using applique with the method of your choice.

Here’s a link to 21 different ideas with Sudoku quilts and art!

Super Sudoku Quilts Using More Complicated Sudoku-Based Puzzles

  • Samurai Sudoku

Samurai Sudoku is a set of 5 Sudoku puzzles superimposed onto each other.

There are 5 puzzles next to each other that overlap in four areas.

The image below I haven’t put the time into getting the correct colors into the correct locations, but this is just an image that shows how the Samurai Sudoku quilt would appear.

If you’re having a hard time finding the overlapping sections, you could always use sashing colors to designate the different puzzles.

To get your own puzzle, you can look at samurai-sudoku.com Just look through the archive until you find an easy pattern and try it on your own. You can always download the solutions.

Also another good Sudoku reference for puzzles of all kinds (including the original and the next ones) that you can print the incomplete puzzle or the solution to the puzzle.

For making a quilt of this kind, you need 41 of the same colors for the blocks for this quilt.

If we use 2 inches finished as the size of your squares inside the block, then the quilt pictured above is 55 by 55, or if you use charm pack sized squares 4 inch finished square then the quilt can be 97 inches square.

It’s easier to upsize and downsize this quilt since it’s so simple!

  • Nonomino Puzzles

Nonomino puzzle is like Sudoku in that there are still rules of Sudoku, such as only one of each number for each row, and then one of each number for each column.

The difference is that instead of a ‘nine patch block’ shape, the blocks are irregular shaped. There are still 1-9 numbers in each block that don’t repeat.

Here is a nonomino puzzle with sashing designating the different groups available for sets of numbers 1-9.

And if I would only do the starting squares on this puzzle instead of filling it all in it would look like this:

Here’s a general sudoku puzzle site that has many variations of sudoku including nonomino and samurai styles of sudoku to try, print, and save.

Like Puzzles, Like Quilts? Send people back to this post and this podcast.