Archive for the ‘Quilting Community’ Category

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40.1 Thoughts on The Creative Place in Spring Hill

July 31, 2016

Hey blog readers, this post is a month back, but finally got pictures uploaded. I anticipate being able to post again this week now that computer pictures have been transferred over. A majority of this was written almost a month ago, and if edited correctly, you wouldn’t notice, but please forgive future & past tense switches that do not make sense if I missed an edit.

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After my March – A – Long this year where I decided to focus on free motion quilting, several miniquilts of mine were quilted in time for our local quilt show in early July.

At the end of June, I was asked to attend a local mini retreat, which was perfect timing for the last bits of quilting needing to be done before the local quilt show.

In Spring Hill, Kansas, in a small downtown area (one block), quilter Kelly Ashton has a building she is calling The Creative Place, a retreat center for crafters.

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Kelly has thought of almost everything a crafter/quilter would want, and frankly, I can’t figure out what she is missing.

I did miss meeting Kelly herself. She came the 2nd night when I was sleeping, and as I was driving away at the end of the retreat, I saw her just outside the front door with the last few remaining retreaters. I did however, see her hexagon presentation to our guild last year (or was it the year before?) and was impressed with her thought process and design even then.

Anyway, this place is great. It’s all one level, so it’s inhabiting like 2 “store fronts” of the downtown Spring Hill area.

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The sewing space is huge. We had 16 – 18 people there One was a grandson who was visiting on one of the days, so mom could get some sewing time in (grandma was at the retreat). We could have had more day-trippers up to 25 may not feel that crowded. We weren’t actively using 7 tables for sewing, so they became quilt design “walls” and holding areas for fans.

But, Kelly also has her own movable design wall (out of PVC pipe), which most of us didn’t need, so sat unused behind one of the main cutting areas. Maybe the 2nd design wall was also hers, or maybe that was someone who brought one.

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What also sat unused, but could have had lots of use, depending on the group, was a huge light table. A large handmade table with lights underneath and plexiglass top that several people could utilize all at the same time.

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What sat underneath the light table, was a GO cutter, but no one also worked with that. I believe it was Kelly’s too, and I believe she wouldn’t have minded we use it either, but that was uncertain to those of us who noticed the cutter in our sewing area.

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In the main sewing area, two bathrooms, with cute decorations, a front area next to the windows, several large ironing surfaces with storage available for use underneath, a back area with lots of local food menus / suggestions, a fridge.

In the front there was also a carpeted sitting area, which would be nice for sitting and chatting with handwork for some of the weekend.

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Moving from the front room, to the left is the kitchen/bathroom/shower/area.  Toward the back of the place were two more bathrooms with step-in showers with handicapped railings.

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Just along the hall were numbered hooks for towels, so each overnight guest wouldn’t get them mixed up, and provide a place for them to dry.

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There were cubbies with extra blankets, and open spaces for people to store their things. Nice ikea shelves with lots of room!

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The dining area is in the same “room” as the kitchen with four smallish tables and four chairs around each.

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Kitchen was stocked with lots of plates, bowls, a brita water pitcher, general kitchen items, two coffee pots, electric water kettle, dishwasher, microwave etc. This was the first retreat that I have personally attended, where we didn’t have “set meals” where we got to go sit and eat together. People could come eat whenever they wanted, they did have to provide the food for ourselves, and there is enough places nearby for those who wanted to eat out.

The ladies coordinated suppers together, first night lasagna, second pulled pork, those meals were sit down with each other, but the rest was “on your own”. Totally different atmosphere than what I’ve seen at other retreats, but totally worth it! More sewing time!

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The only minor downside was the sleeping area. It was very well done, but it was one large room with 16 beds. The only way I am calling it a downside is if there is a majorly loud snorer or if light sleepers have a hard time with noises.

Each bed had its own footrest where the bags/shoes/clothes would be kept. Each bed also had a numbered locker with a key on a bracelet so we could store personal/sensitive things. And on the locker were these low level lights so there could be “walking around” lights during the night that were enough to see to move around at night, but not too distracting for people who were sleeping.

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Behind the sleeping area in the other window store-front was another sitting area with a couch, a couple of more chairs. We had it closed due to the heat. We ended up sewing on one of the hottest weekends of the summer (so far). Fans going constantly. Everywhere.

Also for the person sleeping next to the door to the kitchen area, if the light was on in the kitchen got a blast of light. Light was also a small problem for bathroom trips from the dark sleeping area if people were up and moving around the kitchen, it was sorta jarring due to the bright kitchen area lights. This could potentially be fixed with placement of some mobile kitchen lights that could be turned on during the normal sleeping hours, so the bright overheads could be shut off and the kitchen still be usable. Perhaps they were there and I didn’t see them?

So for those very, very small issues, the rest of the place here is amazing! Highly recommend a group to sign up for this retreat center!

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Across the street was a quilt shop, the Quilted Sunflower, who opened up special on Friday night. Saturday afternoon, the group took a couple of hours going to a neighboring town’s quilt shop in Paola. I missed out on the trip into town because I was on a roll and I have been downsizing my stash a little this year. I did go to the Quilted Sunflower in Spring Hill.

And there are several quilt shops within 30-40 minute drive, for people out of the KC area to use.

This place was just so wonderful, I posted in another retreat’s FB page in case they need to move or want to add an extra retreat. Price seemed reasonable, the experience was lovely! Would do it again in a heartbeat.

Personally, I knew 5 of the ladies sewing with the group that was there, the rest were new to me, but some of them familiar – probably seen them at local quilt shows etc! The lady across from me brought a pattern and fabric for these cute strawberry blocks she was making! In strawberry jam jars! I didn’t realize she wasn’t staying on Sunday and so I didn’t get to say good bye.

Anyway, I highly recommend this place to stay. Reasonable price, lots of thoughtful decisions made on Kelly’s part make this place a really special place for quilters and other crafters to stay as a retreat center!🙂

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40.0 Guild Challenge Quilt from Coloring book inspiration

June 19, 2016

Oy!

I took a few months off quilting to reset. Something about taking all my closet out, moving my ironing board and design wall, only having limited time to do outside tasks before blazing hot temps take hold – where we are now! – and family emergencies during another month, offset me from quilting until getting this challenge quilt ready for the June local guild meeting.

I’ve been a guild member since 2009, and this is the first “guild challenge quilt” I have participated in that we have had of this kind.

Ok, so we were given a challenge fabric and told, keep it small (about 2 feet), add one off white solid, add one other solid, and the rest is up to us.

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So I purchased some variations of solid fabrics.

challenge quilt fabrics

I had a thought about recreating either a fabric design, or a notebook cover, or a coloring book I picked up a while ago.

coloring book inspiration

Between this and a frequently added Pintrest board of gradient colors, I decided to try to recreate the front design.

coloring book inspiration colored diagram

I drew a quick sketch, then one morning, I sat down with some rulers and circles, and drew out and then colored a design based off this colored pencil design. And proceeded to color it in.

colored sketch gradient challenge quilt

I drew the design actually on the heat and bond paper that gave me a “real life” feel of the size of each piece I was adding to the quilt design.

This design turned out very “arty” for my taste. I think I teased a portion of this somewhere else.

close up at drawing

I used the gradients of having several different colors of teal as the focus, and the little accent pieces of yellow, orange and pink to pop in and out of the piece.

Setting up the quilting part, I started looking at videos and how best to approach this. I was essentially setting up a large applique quilt, but have decided in many recent times that I feel like I have very little patience for handwork. I needed to do this quilt raw edge.

I remembered a video Leah Day did of a piecing applique quilt from several years ago.

If you don’t swing back to her video, I used the ideas of a few major concepts that later helped me with my quilt.

  1. Leah showed the upward direction on the back of her pieces so she could piece her quilt correctly again. This helped me get the right orientation.
  2. Leah had an outline behind her fabric she was pasting her quilt onto.
  3. Leah had flipped her design right to left to get the correct orientation on the front. This was something I should have remembered on my own, but actually did not.
  4. Leah suggested cutting and placing strips down on the quilt, line at a time. Which was a slow way, but it got me organizing my quilt in such a way, I didn’t get any part mixed up with any other part.

Ok so I flipped the design around and put the new flipped design on another piece of heat n bond paper. I also eliminated the very “darkest” teal. In matching it up in a line with the other pieces, it had the wrong tone. It was darker, but it had a little bit more brown or grey tinted into the fabric color that didn’t “pop” with the rest of the quilt color.

flipped over outline of piece on heat bond paper

Actually eliminating the one fabric made it easier. I had done a proof of concept piece, and as much as I liked the tweezers and setting the pieces down, I actually liked having slightly larger pieces in my finished piece. It makes it more likely to be done when this is all said and done if the pieces are a little larger.

proof of concept piece

The darkest teal in this piece above, I took out.

my key after ripping off fabric 5

Then I had one more challenge that I myself had created for myself. My original design was on heat N bond, which would mean that if I added pieces to my finished quilt and ironed them down, that I would heat n bond my “design” to the table.

Luckily, I had all the small quilts I have been free motion quilting during the month of March. I took a quilt sandwich of similar size, placed that on the table, and then took a piece of freezer paper, traced the outlines onto the freezer paper from my heat n bond design, then heated up the freezer paper “pattern” onto the back of the quilt sandwich as a barrier for the table.

I had traced the outlines of my design several times before really getting started on the fabric part of my quilt.

When everything was ready, I took some close up pictures of my design for reference.

close up of outline piece on heat bond

And once I had the whole quilt photographed, I carefully cut up the patterns out of the heat n bond paper, one strip at a time.

cut up heat bond pieces

It was so nice using solid fabrics for this quilt, I didn’t have to worry about right side and wrong side. I applied each piece of my template to a piece of numbered fabric. I tried to consider the raw edge quality of the quilt, and attempted to make the main line go along the grain of the fabric if possible.

heat bond pieces reassembled back

After applying the pattern to the fabric, I carefully cut the fabric around each piece, giving a little bit of a seam allowance to each side evenly. I was going to have to slightly overlap the pieces with the neighboring pieces. If each of these pieces didn’t match up with my original designed sizes, that was ok, as long as the overlaps made sense with the rest of the quilt.

heat bond pieces layout front

And here was another section cut out and then flipped over.

heat bond pieces long section

heat bond sections pieces long section front

And a different section that was meant to be “interrupted by another piece”. –  Shown from the back.

heat bond sections two sections assembled back

As I completed each section (slowly), I carried them over from my working space to my ironing board.

layout of several sections on ironing board

After cutting out to size all the sections of this quilt, I picked a section to start with, and using the (faint) outline on the freezer paper as a guideline for placement, got my section organized the way I wanted it. Then hit it with a hot iron.

gradient challenge first piece

The adding of each section became more and more fun. As long as I was paying attention to what goes under what piece, this quilt seemed to work out well. You may be able to see the faint outline under the off-white fabric.

I ended up using tweezers to help me place the “right” fabrics on front or on the back. For me, my general guideline was to have the lighter fabrics on the bottom, except in cases where that was an “alternating design”. I also tried to keep yellow on the bottom in places I would also be able to chose that too.

assembling the pieces raw edge and pattern

I originally had a different blue piece for the top corner that matches the “eye” I have on the right side. After doing all these pieces and strips on these smaller sections of lighter blues, I decided I wanted to add a little bit of color to the background. Adding even more of the quilt pieces to the quilt below.

assembling the pieces, more sections on fabric

In addition, I had a bright patterned yellow fabric that I tried to put into the quilt that would fit in the section next to the blue as part of a “sun” piece. Boy was it bright and distracting. I laid the cutout piece next to that section of the quilt, and it was too distracting. It felt like a “sun” part, but it just wasn’t working.

I did find a very light yellow and forgetting to flip the diagram over, I ended up placing the very very light back of that piece on the bottom right corner opposite my blue piece. It’s there, but hard to even notice, it’s so light.

And then I put the “front side” of the really light yellow to make sure I got a feeling of “offwhite” for the challenge portion of the quilt. It was a very lightly mottled tone-on-tone that fully reads as solid.

finished piece all heat and bond only

This is actually where I am with this quilt right now. It needs sewn down currently.

I did get it spray basted to a piece of batting and backing is the blue fabric in the “eye of the bird”. It reminds me of a bird with arms and a ball in his hand that trumpets out the front.

Sorta kinda but not really.

As I sew these pieces down, I will also quilt through the quilt sandwich at the same time. This will save me a step.

I was able to show off what I have finished to the guild on Tuesday, which was the “soft” due date for the quilt. We had quite a few people bring their challenge quilts to the guild meeting. Mine was not finished, but I was able to hold it up for all to see what I was working on, and to my knowledge, none of the pieces fell off in transport to or from the meeting.

This is going into our quilt show held on July 8th & 9th. Assuming I can actually sew it down & bind it in time. I may even use the challenge fabric in the binding!

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39.9 The end of March-A-Long for another year

April 3, 2016

March A Long Sewing

Frequent/expectant blog readers may have noticed a lack of posting anything last week. This was against my initial intentions, putting off the post too long last weekend made the post unable to happen as I was whisked away from the land of internets for a good day and a half last weekend. Seriously, there are still places in the US that are internet unfriendly.

Anyway, I think the gentle rip from my original plans was enough last weekend to knock the wind out of my (quilting) sails.

Any event, I am here now, a week later, discussing the end of March, the end of March-A-Long, the end of 15 minutes sewing every day.

Thanks go out to all who started and didn’t stop, all who marched loudly the whole month long, all who marched silently, all who wrote hashtags, all who did not, all who posted on social media – this blog, the FB page, twitter, instagram etc.

Thanks go out to all who took just a little more moments to think about quilting on a more daily basis than what they were doing before.

Thanks for encouraging each other, thanks for encouraging me, thanks for going along with this silly experiment in daily self-discipline!

As I state in the audio file, I really liked having a different focus for the month than normal that was broad enough to encompass a lot of different types of tasks. By saying I was doing more free motion quilting, I was doing more basting, more image pinning, more video watching, more drawing lines on pictures, more drawing lines on fabric, more changing of my needle, more thread changes, more foot changes than I had done in the last 11 months!

Way to go everyone!

By the way, I recorded this on April 1st outside, many bird noises and then a train noise that I completely didn’t notice too much when recording.

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39.6 March-A-Long 2016 first week

March 6, 2016

2016-03-01-17.54.47.jpg.jpegI am testing out my Instagram skills this month to try to stay “on top of” pictures for the daily tasks of March-A-Long. March-A-Long is a commitment to sew/quilt/plan for 15 minutes daily during the month of March. As you can see above, this is the pieces of the new block of the month from Ula Lenz Stained Glass Ray of Hope quilt.

A lot of my personal time has been spent on Craftsy. Relearning Free Motion Quilting techniques & designs. I echo quilted the insides of this quilt, but not yet the outsides. Background fabric is too different, so I am going to decide what color works today for this small top.

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If you’ve participated in sewing for 15 minutes a day in March, let me know! Glad to know I’m in such great company already!

Have a great week, and keep on getting those stitches in! Keep experimenting!

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38.9 Quilt Accomplishments for 2015 – the Year of Scraps

January 15, 2016

I would like to recap my 2015 quilt related accomplishments. Many of them are tops, I really did little to no Free Motion Quilting during the year of 2015. I did have three quilts quilted during the year.

Some of the blog posts I was about a month or two behind. Usually I am finding myself sewing or surfing with my extra time, or board game playing, or football watching, or video game playing, or playing solitaire on my phone, or chatting with ladies from 4 other quilting states at the big quilt show this year.

You get the picture. Distractions abound.

From the beginning of the year, I did spend a lot of my weekends quilting, even if they weren’t documented immediately afterwards.

I will try to recap my quilt life 2015, using some familiar pictures, some new.

I started off with the last round of the Twilter Round Robin quilt I was working on for Diane.

Round Robin Dianes Twilt On quilt with Darla borders

I did the last bargello style border (green to blue waves). I drafted this from graph paper. I made more work for myself than I needed to because of the multilevel greens that I added.

I completed the quilt top for fellow quilter (and also once “quilt” podcaster) who lost her husband suddenly in the fall of 2014.

Darla and Ruthanns quilt top

Looking back through my archives, I can’t believe that I forgot to blog about this quilt. It was meant as a nice surprise for Ruthann. She wanted something “green and sciencey”. I had seen this quilt in a book I got in 2014. I had emailed a bunch of other people in our group, most of which remembered Ruthann, but not all of them had.

I had a list of the strip sizes I needed, and instead of the other people sending me “completed blocks” I asked if they could send strips and/or strip sets. I was amazed at what was sent on this quilt.

And I did lots of extra work, cutting up and only using a portion of what was presewn  for me just so I could have a lot of variation on the quilt.

I completed the top in early January, and completed the finished quilt in May, after our meetup with Jackie from Sew Excited Quilts quilted this quilt (and one other) for me.

ruthann and teddy healing quilts

I had overestimated the size of making 5 full DNA strips, so the last one became a “bed runner” which was quilted separately by me at home.

In Feb, at the annual guild retreat, I finally finished my borders and my backing for my Royal Red King’s Puzzle quilt.

Royal Red Kings Puzzle Quilt Top With Borders

In March, I translated the quilting pattern from my Dancing ribbons quilt to ceramics. I need to mount this.

dahlia plate after glazing

I also finished the borders on my weave quilt after figuring out how to do the ends.

Circular ends

I brought a small quilt I had worked on a few years ago, a disappearing four patch quilt, to the lady who was quilting my Royal Red quilt. Sandy from Artfully Quilted did the honor for me for the red quilt, and also works on donation quilts for the local hospital. I was happy to donate my disappearing four patch, even though I was originally going to practice free motion quilting on it.

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I think sometime I worked on the back for the weave quilt, I didn’t finish it, but I got some pieces together for it. I usually piece my backings so I don’t buy the extra large fabrics that often. But it takes some time.

April I made some things for the quilt show, in addition to another quilt block for another quilty podcaster.

galaxy star pattern via quilters cache

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I also received my fantastic Round Robin quilt back and in the squeak of time, got arrangements for this quilt to be in the regional festival. I think I was on top of the world one minute of the day, and I was crying in disappointment the other part of the day. This quilt, didn’t almost make it into the show, and I am blessed that things either worked out for it to be there, or someone gave up a spot or something else happened to allow me to have the quilt in the show. Anyhow I can only take credit for the center, some of the fabrics, and the tiny outside border.

Darlas round robin quilt finished top

May was the finish for the show, getting all these quilts ready with labels, sleeves, and everything prior to June. It was also time for me to get extra wound up for inviting some friends to Kansas City area.

May I also met with Jackie for our (now annual sorta) sewing day at her studio!

Royal Red styled on porch swing

June was our regional quilt festival, and fantastic meetup with friends and with guildmates, seeing other friends’ quilts and making new friends.

twilter meetup five twilters at barbecue

three of seven twilters entwined

In July I finalized my “watermelon dresden” pattern for myself, and worked on getting my studio organized, and set myself up for the fall of scrappy quilts.

water melon dresden version 2

string quilt small

August, I was getting myself organized and sewing all the 16 patches that eventually became my Arkansas Crossroads quilt. And getting more strings for the hashtag quilt swap.

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And I was starting to make shoo flys for the disappearing shoo fly quilt.

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I also took some time out to make a few small blocks for other small projects. These went to different quilts for different projects, but are both definitely “my” style.

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I made my hashtag blocks to be sent out to the twilter swap.

string hastag blocks to send

And received some different ones in return.

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Then the end of the year I started sewing together all the scrappy pieces I was working on in the fall.

shoo fly top as a table topper scrap quilt

I think I just blogged about unsewing and resewing my Winslow’s Corners quilt, which took up some of my November time.

Winslows Corners Quilt with good corners

I experimented but haven’t yet committed on a low contrast, but high saturation scrap chevron quilt. (still in many smaller pieces)

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One weekend I looked at all the scraps I had left over from Ruthann’s quilt in the spring and put together a different top for picnicking.

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And on Thanksgiving day, got my Watermelon Dresden quilt layout figured out with actual fabric pieces I am working on.

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Currently I am in a “small battle” (with myself) as I ran out of the background fabric needed to make the quilt. The shop that sold it to me in November, I called, and they don’t have the same fabric anymore. I am working out how to do it since I started some of the border pieces already in one fabric.

Actually, the quilt will have lots of background space due to how I set the border pieces. I figure there will be lots of room for background quilting on this quilt.

And since I am writing this in January, I will hold off on my latest quilt block project. That is actually finished – for January anyway.

Oh… and in April, just before all the mess for the quilt show started, I attempted to quilt my Samurai Sudoku quilt. But I was having a bad day, things weren’t lining up right. I haven’t yet told myself to rip out and start over on the quilting, but I almost have. I have been avoiding the longarm rental since I have to make a decision on this quilt that I will not like to make right now.

upclose picture of samurai sudoku quilt on longarm

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38.0 Kansas City Regional Quilt Festival – Diary – Day 2 – Part 2 – Judged quilts and Categories

July 6, 2015

The weekend of June 19th – 21 was the Kansas City Regional Quilt Festival otherwise known as #KCRQF.

I have decided I had so much to say about the quilt show that I would write down in diary format what I went through on different days of the festival, share possibly a few stories, and pretend to take you along with me to the festival.

I am in the middle of covering Saturday, my main day of seeing the festival. My last post was about the guild quilts, and my post about that was the friday twilter meetup day.

So after taking the pictures of all the guild quilts I was ready to go do something else, look at vendors maybe. But when I got back up to the front, two ladies with sheets and golf pencils were there, ready to ask if I would help in determining viewers choice for all the guild quilts.

How could I decline?

So I went back through trying to decipher all what quilt fits into what category. Because the quilts on this side were organized by guild, this made it much harder to pick a favorite. What if my actual favorite was in the back and I failed to go back and see the quilt again?

Organization of Guild Quilts & Quilt Show Categories

Also some categories had only a few entrants, and some categories had many many entrants.

The categories for this show were:

  • Pieced Hand Quilted
  • Pieced Machine Quilted
  • Applique Hand Quilted
  • Applique Machine Quilted
  • Mixed Techniques Hand Quilted
  • Mixed Techniques Machine Quilted
  • Innovative

There were only a few hand quilted items. VERY impressive, but most of the hand quilted quilts were only competing against a few other quilts. These were hard to find in the show.

They were exquisitely done, don’t get me wrong, but perhaps all the handquilting needs to be in a category by itself so there are more quilts to be judged against?

Just a thought.

The Mixed Techniques Machine quilted category has about 100 quilts, the Pieced Machine Quilted category has about 200 quilts, and Innovative has about 30 quilts.

It’d be interesting to see a different way for the show to be broken up.

Perhaps the unevenness of the quilts is due to the fact that we were not limited by how many quilts in each category we could put into the show for the guild side of the show. I know my two quilts went in as the same category, so they competed against each other.

Anyway, the quilt I put down for viewers best of show I somehow failed to get the name of the quilter, so I cannot attribute this quilt to anyone correctly right now.

applique quilt best of show for me

applique quilt best of show for me

I think I was mesmerized by the crystals on the borders. Blurry picture below. Oops.

blurry picture of borders

blurry picture of borders

There were many quilts, and it was fun to run back and forth down the isles, making quick marks on the side of the paper to see which quilts would win in each category. Unfortunately I didn’t take track of my voting sheet for posterity.

After voting for the quilts, it was already lunch time, and the remaining twilters were meeting for lunch.

We had decided this time not to go “off campus” for lunch because parking the day before was hard. So we went back to the connecting Sheraton hotel and had a fancy lunch with hardly any other guests.

No pictures of this event, what were we thinking??

Anyway, it was nice to sit and learn about the private lives of the twilters who came by and to share some thoughts about etsy, quilting, traveling, home life, past lives. I think this was the lunch where I was more quiet & listened a lot. It was so neet just being with friends we haven’t really seen, but have had a chance connecting with online in many different ways.

I still had vendors to see & shop, the judged quilts to photograph, and the Beatles quilts to go view before we left. AND I wanted a picture of the 3 of us who worked on the round robin quilt. We were mostly separate for the afternoon, I went off on my own again, met up with Jackie & her friend Jackie occasionally on the vendor floor, Tami & Valerie went off to rest … it was a big trip and there is a lot of walking involved here.

three of seven twilters entwined

I didn’t take too many pictures of vendors because that was the only possible restriction for pictures for the show. Some vendors rightfully so don’t want people to take pictures of their quilts and patterns. Not all of them, but some, and that’s understandable.

I walked by several vendors I knew from other shows, some I had spoken to before, some I had not. One was Caitlyn who used to be in our guild who opened up her own modern fabric store that she even rented space from a local downtown area for about a year and a half. It was nice to see her again!

Also I met with Nikki who helps with the Quilts of Valor and is a member of like 2-3 guilds (not mine though) and we have become facebook friends and have similar tastes in quilts. She keeps telling me I should join the Modern guild. If they met in the afternoon, I’d consider it.

I zeroed in on a few vendor items I wanted to come back to later. Then onto the judged quilts.

How the Judged Quilts worked in KCRQF

The judged quilts were open to anyone who wanted to enter their quilts into the show who got in their entry in time with enough space.

I do not know if they cut off certain categories early, but entrants had the entire month of March to enter their quilts for the show. I was seeing they were still requesting submissions at the end of March.

There were no jury on the quilts, it seemed to be “first come, first served”. Each entrant could only enter one quilt per category. And you didn’t have to be a member of any of the guilds to be entered into the show. Or even local. Most were though.

The same 7 categories were in the judged quilts as were for the guild quilts above. Again, it seemed like there were not as many hand quilted items as machine quilted items. A few categories had less than 10 entrants.

This side was also less entered than the guild side. I was glad to see the guild quilts strong, but surprised how few people entered their quilts for judging. Perhaps we all want to get the quilts at the show, but don’t want to know what the judges have to say about the quilts.

My quilt was WAY down at the back of the show, at the end, right near the food. So people would have to see it if they were heading towards the food at the back of the show from the judged quilt section.

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I love it, but was surprised how dark the quilt seemed compared to the other quilts around it.

My guild members were great at telling me they thought it could have won something. It is definitely dramatic looking. I tried not to spend too much time hovering around my quilt. Unfortunately, it was hanging next to a truly innovative quilt. One I kept seeing people go up to and exclaiming how good it was! And I liked it too.

I had put my quilt in innovative and should have put it into another category, pieced machine quilted. I really thought it would have more chance in this category. I decided early & quickly to put it into the show, and then thought later about the category a little more.

Anyway, here are some of the judged quilts I saw & took pictures of. Again in gallery form. I was way less diligent at getting names on all the quilts here, so instead I am just going to label all the quilts the same. More about the show in the next post.

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37.9 Kansas City Regional Quilt Festival – Diary – Day 2 Part 1 Guild Quilts

June 28, 2015

The weekend of June 19th – 21 was the Kansas City Regional Quilt Festival otherwise known as #KCRQF.

I have decided I had so much to say about the quilt show that I would write down in diary format what I went through on different days of the festival, share possibly a few stories, and pretend to take you along with me to the festival.

After much uncertainty (of my schedule … see a story about Saturday schedule in previous post), I had Saturday to visit the show mostly free. The only thing for certain on my agenda was a Lecture done by Trisch Price about designing quilts in a series, and that wasn’t until the end of the show day.

I was planning to treat myself to breakfast at a fancy breakfast place, but decided instead to go to Panera and of course a bird came begging along for some food (cheese bagel).

begging bird

After it was clear I wasn’t going to be needed, I sat down with fellow guild member Lois and we talked a little bit about family and living away from a place we grew up. Lois is our current guild secretary and does a fantastic job remembering / recording all the details during our meetings that I usually miss some.

Both of us were worried the guild booth would not be staffed on Saturday, and both of us came early to make sure we weren’t needed to help setup/run the booth Saturday. Neither of us were needed, so we were free to enjoy the show.

I stood in line for the show behind the lady with this T-shirt, which was ironic because I had a similar T-shirt on – same saying, different artwork/fonts.

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The T-shirt reads: “Never underestimate the power of a woman with a sewing machine”. I ordered mine online two weeks prior, and it showed up in the mail on the Friday of the show. Quilt magic was surrounding this whole entire show, I tell you.

Viewing The Show & Taking Picture Strategy

Anyway, I went right into the show and I decided I wanted to get pictures of all the quilts. All 700 quilts. As good as I can. And yes, I am going to try to do it on my new phone. The camera on this new phone has the same megapixels as my older camera in my “pockets of awesome”, but it seemed to work faster & easier than the regular point & shoot camera.

I noticed all the other people starting at the front, heading slowly down the rows to the back. I had already been to the show the day before, so why not start at the back and head towards the front?

I tried to do a systematic way for getting pictures of the quilts. I started back to front, each side of the show at a time. Then in the next side repeat the process of back to front.

quilt traffic at 3pm sunday

Also each section of the walls was like a “C” shape, so I tried NOT to move away from each C until I got at least some picture of each quilt in each section before moving to the next section. If people were standing in front of one quilt, I tried to get a picture of a different quilt. There were 3-10 quilts in each “C shaped” section.

Arbitrary rules for my arbitrary completionist attitude. I do have to say I do a similar thing when I photograph quilts for our local quilt show. Very methodical and it gets at least one good picture of each quilt in the show for our posterity for the guild.

Of course for our own guild, I bring a tripod to make sure the camera is steady and centered at the center of the quilt. But this is just for ME, not for everyone at the guild to enjoy.

 

But this time, I was trying to SPEED through. Almost as fast as possible. AS I was going, I was trying not to blur everything, not necessarily document EVERY quilt maker too, but one shot, one idea of each quilt at a time.

The back to front technique was a great idea. I had also read taking pictures in the morning was the best time. And I had witnessed that to be true during our local guild-only show.

But for this show, probably the best time would have been like 3 in the afternoon. It was way less crowded than right away in the morning. The picture above shows traffic at 3PM on Sunday, almost dead compared to early Saturday morning.

I joked around with people that back to front was awesome because I could go picture/picture/picture for a long time, and then “thump” hit the wave of people coming towards the back. Today they all had pieces of paper with them and a pencil too. So they were slower, and more methodically going through the quilts. I liked dashing to the back quickly as if I had someplace to be.

Guild Quilts

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The two halves of the show were organized completely differently. It was almost as if there were 2 shows together in one – three if you count the Beatles exhibit.

The guild quilts were organized by guild. We had no restrictions on how many of each category of quilt would be entered with the guild, as they were not necessarily going for judging. Which means we had hand quilted quilts next to machine quilted quilts next to innovative quilts, and applique quilts.

The different colors of hanging papers signified the different categories of the quilts. As you may be able to see in the picture above, one of the local guild names on the top right, a quilt with a blue tag, and then on the far left a yellow tag which would be next to the quilt next to it. These two quilts were in the same guild, Kaw Valley Quilters Guild, but not the same type of quilts.

I liked how this showed & felt like community. The book lists all the names of all the quilts by Guild for the guild side of the show. Guilds first, then quilters.

A few of the guild quilts

My speed method of taking pictures did have its downside. I have plenty of pictures that are blurry. Which is too bad I couldn’t settle myself down enough to take a good picture. I think it was how I was going close to some quilts, and then far for the next quilts. The camera probably couldn’t figure out what focus to use and I am sure if I wasn’t “fighting against time” I could have slowed down a little bit more.

There were 700 quilts to photograph if I wanted them all. And we had planned to do lunch with the twilters, and I wanted my picture with twilters in front of Twilters Entwined quilt, and I hadn’t seen the vendors, and I hadn’t seen the Beatles quilts, and I had the lecture, and Sunday I was going to be volunteering.

So I SPED through the quilts. Too bad. I missed out on some great pictures.

I did get some pictures of hanging cards next to the quilts. Looking over them in detail this weekend I figured out something. If I really liked a quilt at the “gut level”, I took a second picture of the tag. Sometimes the tags were blurry. Sometimes they were fine.

Good thing I had the guild book to help me decipher names here.

I am going to post these as a gallery, something I don’t often do. It seems if you click on one, it takes you through the gallery at more full size. Let me know if this feature has issues. It seems to work on my computer when I test it. About 30 pictures of quilts with names of artists attached.

NOW THE GUILD QUILTS