Archive for the ‘Quilting Design’ Category

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38.2 Winslow Corners quilt idea

August 9, 2015

I have had the privilege of sewing many days after work this week. Mindless sewing mainly from leaders & enders I was putting into place from a while ago.

After my “turn-it-around” sewing room organization from a week ago, I have been motivated by the fact that I can actually watch my computer screen for entertainment instead of constantly being turned around to see what’s been on the screen.

I have been motivated by taking an old reality series that I have watched most seasons of, rewatching them years later. I forget easily, so this time it’s like watching ‘new-old’ television.

So I have some distraction that is not too distracting and that, in turn, is motivating me to keep working and working. Almost as if it was March-A-Long again.

Anyway, my leaders & enders are resulting in 16 patches of the cool color family.

16 patch blocks

So far, I have mindlessly sewn 30 of them.

I had made a “pattern” for this quilt a while ago and have had this idea for a scrap quilt for a while. I don’t need 30 of the 16 patches for the finished quilt. Here’s the quilt.

arkansas crossing x and o quilt

I have a light grey and want to use some of the extra neutrals from the quilt I made for Laura for the alternate blocks.

I don’t have the pattern centered or bordered or anything, but yes, I have printed out the paper pieced X blocks, aka album blocks.

I have heard several names for this quilt:

  • X’s and O’s
  • 16 patch and album blocks
  • Arkansas Crossroads

I do have a small history with quilting in Arkansas now. I travel there every fall (so far) for a quilting retreat. Northeast Arkansas, not incredibly far away from the KC area.

A tiny town called Winslow, there is a couple who run a B & B cabins (Sky-Vue) that host 16 quilters who come & sew for an extended weekend. If you have followed me any time in the fall, you have heard me talking about it.

Anyway, I want to make a quilt with a name something like Winslow Corners or possibly Sky-Vue crossing.

Using these no-thinking blocks out of my ever growing scrap pile.

That’s been a vague direction I have been quilting in this week.

I haven’t started on the paper piecing portion, but now have 30 of the 16 patch blocks. It’s so easy to make these 16 patch blocks.

Surely more of these blocks will go somewhere else if I run out of  paper piecing blocks (x blocks).

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I have also made some random half square triangles in sets of 4 that I want to match with my pinwheel blocks someday.

wpid-20150809_175528.jpg

I also have a small sewing mat for my sewing foot pedal.

I have a wandering foot, but I like to elevate the back of my foot and sew more evenly. I frequently have a phone book by and/or under my sewing machine foot pedal.

I just made this late this afternoon, so I haven’t yet tried it out. I have the non stick gripper on the front and back, and to give the pad some “oomph” to simulate raising the foot pedal some, I have a piece of folded over fabric that is folded over two small batting scraps inside.

It’s really batting, fabric, then a binding stitched around that whole block. Then I have a ‘stopper’ of rolled up batting sewn down in a pocket on the top.

I was inspired by this tutorial, but did not follow it directly. I read it a few weeks ago and then when I gotten the “gist of it” I created from vague memory today.

Anyway, it’s been a week of happy sewing, I hope this post finds you well. No matter if you meet in the crossroads of arkansas or elsewhere.

Still marinating about my “next biggest bestest quilt” for the quilt show in 2 years. Glad to not really think about it too hard yet.

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37.6 How Round Robins Work

May 23, 2015

This is a post describing how round robins work, or rather, how our round robin worked, complete with pictures.

If you missed a while on the blog or were redirected here from elsewhere, I was included in a multi-group internet friends (twilter-twitter quilter friend) round robin quilt exchange.

One fantastic lady, Daisy of Lazy Daisy Quilts decided to put together a round robin quilt exchange and asked for signups from interested people back at the beginning of 2014.

There were enough ladies who wanted to participate that we had 3 groups: Twilter Round Robin Group A, Twilter Round Robin Group B, Twilter Round Robin Group C. Our group was Group A

Basic Definition of a Round Robin quilt exchange:

Round Robin quilts are long-term projects in which each person works on other peoples’ projects during the time of the round robin, passing along a quilt idea, fabric, and a rapidly growing partial quilt top to each participant until the quilt ends back in the original quilter’s possession.

For me, it all started off with a pattern from electric quilt, a fabric choice & then a block.

center for round robin quilt darla

Here’s the first question I am asked when talking about the round robin: How does it work?

Generally, a round robin quilt (as our group did it) is an agreement between friends or strangers and friends to work on a quilt of someone else’s with the understanding that they will work on yours in return.

My role in the round robin:

  1. I made the center of the quilt. I decided what colors to be used & original quilt direction.
  2. I selected fabrics for the quilt to use in the quilt.
  3. I provide some kind of guidelines or suggestions to the others in the group for working on the quilt.
  4. I send the quilt onto the next person in the list (in the mail or in person). I am always sending to the same next person.
  5. I receive someone else’s quilt in the mail, with their center (or more), their fabrics, their instructions. I am always receiving a quilt from the same previous person.
  6. I work through an appropriate design to add a border to the outside of the quilt. Using math, graph paper, books or websites for inspiration, sometimes electronic quilt blocks or suggestion from Electric Quilt 7 (EQ7).
  7. I follow general guidelines by the round robin coordinator for each round to help spur imagination or direct the appropriate design. Not to be used religiously with all quilts in all situations, but to help stretch each quilter, and attempt to provide harmony with the finished project.
  8. I finish my section of the new border, sometimes making changes due to size restrictions, or fabric shortages which happens because we’re not always great at figuring out in advance what fabrics others would be appealing to the general design or just underestimation. Sometimes this step also requires purchasing fabric of our own.
  9. I write down something interesting in the process in the quilt journal. (optional) I write my name on a label provided by the original quilter (optional, but fantastically helpful in the end).
  10. I send the quilt top with my new border to the same next person in line.
  11. Receive the new quilt, repeat steps 5-10 until the original quilt comes back. I have a full quilt top and a full label and journal.

Twilter Round Robin Group A final collage

 

The coordinator has a lot of decisions to make before getting the round robin started.

The round robin coordinator’s role:

  1. They decide the groups (if more than 6 want to be part of the round robin) 5-6 people seem to be a good match for this round robin.
  2. They create a deadline for each border swap.
  3. The estimate the approximate amount of each type of fabric needed to make the quilt work, suggest the amount of background fabric, focus fabric, and other fabric to be used in making of a quilt top.
  4. The estimate the sizes of each of the borders to be proportional to the space on the quilt.
  5. They create general guidelines to help direct the future quiltmakers down a path to help create a good quilt and/or to ask people to work out of their own comfort zones.
  6. They coordinate the addresses and order of each person to do the round robin.
  7. They answer general questions, help figure out if deadlines need adjusted.
  8. They type up all the info and get it to the participants. Follow up if needed in some areas. Perhaps some handholding or drama-gathering if needed in some groups.
  9. Remind us it’s all fun.

Round Robin Twilter Group A

As you can see above, we had 6 different quilts with 6 different personalities and styles.

How does the passing of the quilts work?

Because we had a round that we passed quilts on to each other, and each person was in a different order, we were able to affect each quilt at a different stage of its development.

  • The first two quilts each of us received, we were only beginning to shape the look and feel of the quilt to follow.
  • The next round brought the middle into focus, the meat of the quilt,
  • The last two rounds were on the finishing side of the round, these were larger & took up more time & fabric.

Our round went like this:

Daisy passes to me, I pass to Diane, Diane pass to Laura, Laura pass to Tami, Tami pass to Tina, Tina pass to Daisy.

twilter round robin how the quilts got passed in a round

And each of us had our own version of that. The drawing above shows how the quilts were passed around.

My role in the round robin Group A, and the quilts as I saw them in the order I worked on them

Round 1 – Daisy

Since Daisy’s was the first round robin quilt I saw, it was the first one I worked on, and thus the smallest round to do.

This is a collage of the completed quilt of Daisy’s (on the left), the block as I received it, and the block as I finished it.

daisys finished quilt center and my portion

Once completed, I wrote in the journal, and on the label, then sent it in the mail to Diane.

Once Daisy was finished with the next quilt – Tina’s quilt, she sent it in the mail to me. As you will see I was always receiving from Daisy and sending to Diane. So I really only had to have 1 address.

Round 2 – Tina

Tina’s quilt only had her center and Daisy’s first border. The sky was the limit here.

tinas finished quilt center and my portion

The picture above is Tina’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 3 – Tami

At the “halfway point” everyone was working on the opposite person’s quilt. I was working on Tami’s quilt when she was working on mine.

tamis finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Tami’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 4 – Laura

Laura’s quilt was based on neutral fabrics. Greys and browns dominated the landscape of this quilt top with dramatic golds and blue hues thrown in for a smidge of color

lauras finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Laura’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 5 – Diane

Diane’s quilt was mostly done. I was trying to figure out an appropriate finish for her quilt.

dianes finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Diane’s finished quilt on the left. Which is also the portion that I worked on and sent out to her. Top right is the original block, bottom right is the quilt top as I received it.

More notes about Round Robin Quilts & observations

Since it was a center-focused round robin where we added further borders to the outside of an already ‘finished’ project, so the projects usually take on a medallion feeling.

Each quilter has to essentially be a “border designer”, and has to be willing to either ‘do the math’ or make a program (like EQ7) do the math for them.

I used inspiration from either drawing graph paper, or Electric Quilt 7, or a book on borders, or pinterest pictures, or various books on techniques. Sometimes I tried several different versions of the quilt, but once I kept seeing one version in my mind more than 1 day, that is the variation I went with.

There is an option to do rows instead of medallion rounds, which would be the same amount of work on the last one as on the first one. This would work in a similar way, but are usually called “Row Robin” quilts instead.

The first round we received, we had a shortened timeframe, but we had less size to finish before sending it off. This was stressful for me, but I did get the quilt done by or close to the deadline most of the time.

Each swap we had different goals, different color pallets, different visions to try to work into the quilts. It is truly a good way to sew out of the comfort zone.

And since the twilters who were interested in this swap were all over the US, the boxes got some post office traveling time around the country.

Some of the early quilts I worked on, I was completely surprised with at the end.

We got to learn about each person as reading through the journal entries of the original quiltmaker, in addition to things other people said in the journal. I was inspired by things in the journal in addition to other blocks and items I saw elsewhere. Many times the journal dictated the “tone” of the quilt more than anything!

Math was very helpful in the round robin. Having the original dimensions of each quilt, then trying to figure out how to put blocks together with appropriate spacers was challenging, but a heck of a lot of fun.

It helped me to use a program like EQ7 to help with the math and to visually see if the blocks I were doing were too big or not big enough or if I needed to add spacers.

Often times, I used my moleskin graph paper the most as it was the perfect thing to visually count other parts of the quilt.

Another note was to not try to overshadow the other people’s work. Since I try to do “big bold complicated” this was a constant worry for me, and something that at times reigned me in, and other times I probably ignored. Looking back, I ended up adding a darker border many times to the quilts I received. I don’t know if/what that says about me.

The most important part is to leave a part of yourself in the quilt that you’re working on. Being true to who I am is very important to me, even if I don’t always know what that looks like. So even during the “potential overshadows” I may/maynot have done, I still made quilts that were pleasing to me, that were something that I could do as well as I could.

That’s what matters & that is what’s special about these quilts.

In summary (visual)

The quilts as I worked on them, the center block, what I did to them, and their final product.

Round Robin Progress

Yay for round robins with friends!

 

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37.3 Finishing the old inspires the new

April 7, 2015

One major benefit of my annual March-A-Long is that often times to help fulfill my self requirement of 15 minutes of sewing a day, that I dive onto Quilter’s Cache or into EQ7 and start looking at new quilts, new blocks, new ides, new patterns.

Also, working on the long-ago formed Weave Quilt last month, made me think about other quilts that I have been close on. Figuring out what steps need to be done to finally finish those that are close or “oh so close” that sit in the corner unused, unadmired.

I have been wanting to get back to work on the longarm again, but to do that, I needed a quilt that was ready with a finished backing. I end up piecing like “all” of my backs for some reason or another, I don’t like buying backing fabric.

And I have been about 16 inches short on a back for my samurai Sudoku quilt for a few years now. So close. I have the pattern for the quilting picked out, I have the hours prepaid for renting time on the long arm.

But my aversion to phones & appointments, and the not finished back has kept me down, kept me from getting another bed sized quilt done.

Until this past weekend. Whoo! The back of this monster is done!

samurai sudoku top

This does not fit in my living room.

Luckily, I just had to make the backing a little larger. I hope it is square enough.

samurai sudoku backing with zippers

I even sewed the zippers on because I knew I wanted to quilt this one next.

As much fun as it would be to do custom quilting on this quilt, I don’t have the time or energy to do so, I have a large pantograph for this quilt that I bought a few years ago when I finished the border.

And finally I had an open day off with nothing else planned, and so decided to call to rent time on the long-arm.

Thanks to the guild for having a long-arm panel this last month and opening up the conversation to getting quilts done that way.

And I have an appointment for friday. I hope I remember it all! I think I will!

And then since I was on a “finishing up borders kick” I decided to stop where I was on the gemini sky quilt, which in my mind I had been wanting something else on the borders than what I had already done.

gemini sky with one border

And I finished pieces for the backing on this quilt too. since I was thinking about backings.

So I have another quilt ready for the quilting stage. 🙂

And then thought of 2 other things to do to other quilts, other ideas for new quilts. Neither of which are matched up yet, and I misplaced something I need for one thing.  My hand appliqued hot air balloon has the perfect backdrop once I figure out where I stashed it.

I am excited to get these old items done & done. Then I can say I completed more than like 1 quilt in 2015.

I would like to do more of these. Maybe as a series.

turquoise single tumbling block

And since I wanted a “dice bag” for my carcassonne tiles. I made 2. One for me and one to sell at the quilt show. 2nd one is the same, but not pictured here.

dice bag drawstring

Anyway, wish me luck. I am heading friday to quilt the samarai sudoku quilt, and then saturday to play tabletop games for tabletop day. Looking forward to my long weekend of fun!

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37.0 Twilt On My Last Round Robin Quilt

March 13, 2015

Between the month of January & February, I was frantically running around trying to finish the very last Round Robin quilt I did for my #twilter group A.

At the time of this writing, I still have not received my own round robin back, but I hear it’s coming, delayed by fabric selection.

Anyway, I had looked at an idea on Pinterest while searching for something else, and this border idea kept sticking to me as a great way to finish off a quilt.

First, the picture of the end, then we’ll discuss the process.

Round Robin Dianes Twilt On quilt with Darla borders

The idea I had seen was a strip style quilt with white borders, an accent color, and then multicolor strips outside extending to the end.

I had punched this into EQ7 and no matter what I saw there, I just couldn’t decide that they were any better than the strip idea I had seen on pinterest.

This was the quilt as I had received it.

dainesroundrobinsquareoriginal lightened

It was so lovely pinned to my design wall (it was heavy, needed pins to help keep it up there).

The whole quilt was so whimiscal & fun. It needed a whimsical & fun last border on it.

Anyway, I had been doing bargello quilting for a while, my Royal Red King’s Puzzle quilt is a bargello style, and so was another quilt I was working on (not shown yet), and so my mind was doing strips anyway.

Lucky me, the math worked out fantastically and I could make 12 inch blocks.

So I drew it up in my sketchbook, abandoning all these EQ7 variations I had done during Nov-Jan.

sketch of quilt borders smaller

I can divide easy numbers easily, and I first was thinking I would do a plain inner border and maybe inset some applique swirls on it, which would have also have been really nice too.

the original drawing and some math smaller

But then I started laying out fabric for it, and I found I had a really nice light green that looked like a good compliment to Daisy’s white & green disappearing four patch round.

I was thinking the green was like the grass for the birds, Daisy’s round was like a white picket fence, and then I decided to do a pathway & some sky, using the pathway as the contrasting color.

The pathway & the blue sky border are actually pieces I purchased for Laura’s neutral round robin that didn’t exactly “go” with her quilt, but were close. Well the pathway I bought & the light blue/grey that I used that I bought were for her quilt, and then I tacked on the bright blue butterflies to the order for ME, but they looked really good next to the blues in the birdhouse round. So decisions I thought I was making wrong earlier, ended up being good decisions now.

And then I decided to change the green fabric. Why? Because the green fabric I originally picked (not shown) was a lower quality. I could tell. It would have worked well for me, but not for a friend. It was perfect though in shade & lightness. So I had to substitute.

trying out borders in strips

Which lead me to the lightest seafoam green fabric I have in the quilt.

But the fabric was “too plain” by itself. It was a good shade of green, the closest to what I was searching for, but it was too plain by itself.

But then I also saw the next lightest green at the fabric shop that mirrored Daisy’s fabric just exceptionally, even though it was darker than I wanted. I decided to do both in the quilt and then just layer them next to each other.

THEN I had the even darker batik sitting next to my computer. And as the week went on, it kept taunting me, telling me to gradate the greens into 3 levels of dark.

Which I did! And I love it.

redrawing to accomodate fabric changes smaller

And as you can see from the picture above, I had a fairly easy time of making the blocks once they were figured out. Each half was only 7 strips of varying widths.

Strips of green & strips of blue & brown. The blue & brown I made easy and made a base unit, then tacked on the extra blue to the base unit for the different lengths of the strips.

The greens I had less of a defined base unit, but that was ok.

various strips

Bargellos are a lot of work, don’t get me wrong, but there is an ease to them. You sew the strips into sets (base units) and then cut up those sets to the widths you need.

The hard part is going back to the ironing board for all these seams.

And here I could see it was going to work!

trying out the corner blocks

The corners were actually the trickiest part, trying to decide the order I would quilt them in. Part of it is like a log cabin block, and part is strips.

I snuck in the focus fabric into the little part of the border in addition to some of my pretty pink fabric as a nice compliment.

closeup of corner blocks

My only regret is not bringing in some of the cream into the quilt. I love it, but I think cream sitting right next to the pathway fabric would have eased some of the green we see here.

I calculated about 2000 pieces in total for the entire round of the quilt. Not to brag, again, bargello easily lends itself to having lots of pieces with less individual sewing sections in it.

That did lead me a few thoughts about my quilting insecurities. 1) Did I go overboard? 2000 is a lot of pieces. 2) Did my sections of the quilt overshadow the other sections of the quilt. 3) Did I try to show off?

I had the realization that not only did I do my best job for a quilt for a friend, but I did a style of quilt that was pleasing to me in a style that I was comfortable doing, something that I was familiar with, and also shows my style enough for others to know just by looking at it that border was mine. I did my best to match the other’s sections, and perhaps there is a little bit of overboardness, but even though it took a lot of 2 full days of 2 full weekends, it meant a lot to me to make something that I am proud of that can go to my friend Diane, who had to put up with all my insecurities with the Round Robins along the way.

And with that, I am done with my section of the Round Robin quilts. Once I receive mine, I will see what pictures are in the flickr group and put together a roundup for the round robin in its own post. I hear mine is outstanding, I can’t wait to see it.

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36.8 Translating quilting pattern to Ceramic

March 7, 2015

Hey!

I have started to look at EQ7 again with my March-A-Long goals. Later today is the day I meet with the quilter for the Royal Red King’s Puzzle quilt.

So I have been doing some quiet quilting, even a little applique at the car oil change place!

Yesterday I had a unique art experience I had to share at Sunfire Ceramics.

There is this cute little shop in Lawrence KS just downtown off to the side a little bit. And they have all these unglazed pots, bowls, cups, teapots, figurines, etc.

And they have these little tables and whole bunches of glaze that people can come & paint onto their ceramics of their choice.

I have had a coupon (groupon) for like ‘ever’, even bought a 2nd one before using my first.

I have been thinking I was going to paint a teapot. But I like mugs.

And a few months ago, I was planning on going on a monday day off, but they’re closed Mon & Tues. So I decided to take a quilting pattern, one I quilted on the Dancing Ribbons quilt with corners to put on either the teapot/mug.

When I got there, I looked at the shapes of the items, and I decided to make 2 objects, neither of them a teapot.

Finished photo first, after several hours of listening to their music, chilling out at the studio.

Dahlia in ceramics painted

The dahlia is one I quilted in the background on the Dancing Ribbons quilt:

quilting corner tricord colors

Which almost shows up in the picture above, but not exactly.

Anyway, the dahlia had 10 points, so I wasn’t able to divide it into 3 colors to match the tricord colors.

So I put the blue in as a 4th color & alternated rows & colors. Then decided dark teal for the lines & the outside instead of the dark blue.

How did I follow the pattern?

Pencil marks. You take the pattern, trace it over with pencil.

dahlia drawing from pinterest

Then I flipped it over pencil (drawing side) down on top of the plate. I originally tried rubbing with eraser, and that was leaving a little bit of a mark, but not a full mark.

Then I decided to trace the back with pencil, thinking that the pencil on the front would rub off with more pressure on the back. And it worked. The lines on the ceramic were thinly there, but they were there enough to go back & retrace again on the ceramic itself with pencil.

dahlia pencil marks on ceramics

And then after that point I didn’t get any more pictures until the end except for my inspirational art deco pictures I found in a book that was at the shop.

art deco border inspiration

And the setup of the whole table picture.

scene at the ceramics place before painting

The glazes are in the size of the little paints bought at michaels, walmart, etc, and the pallet & paintbrush are there to hold them. It was like going back 20 years to my ceramics class in college.

I also painted a mug as well, with 2 sides. This one also with the same color family to “match”.

painted mug with flower stamp

This side was from a stamp. I had to help enhance the stamp a bit & I  sorta like it, I wonder how it will look when finished.

painted mug with borders

The other side I was using some swoops and dots to make borders. I am a right handed person, so this will be the side I will see the most.

I think I am less happy with the mug because I didn’t have a plan of attack on it, I just wanted to do something nice with borders. I had forgotten to bring my drawing borders book that I own for further inspiration. I never found a book at the library before coming that was perfect inspiration either.

Anyway, next time (I have to come back sometime & do a bargello style mug, I have decided) I will do something different, maybe I will make a red & black one to match my red & black quilt too. I imagine for the bargello mug I will use a stencil or ruler to draw straight lines with.

I wish I would have planned the mug a day ago, I have a picture in my mind to match the red & black quilt, I think that would be nice on a mug!

I used a dark teal as the base of these items, I hope it’s a good enough color combo. We’ll see in a week when the thing gets fired. They put a top coat glaze over the top that is shiny to make the ceramics able to eat off off.

Anyway that’s my non-quilting/quilting adventures for Friday. A lovely day off!

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36.6 I am Planning on Entering Kings Puzzle quilt in a Regional Show!

February 28, 2015

Hey everyone! Long time no see here.

I have been working on projects for others. Until 2 weeks ago, I went to a retreat, and I finally finished up the borders on my Royal Red Kings Puzzle quilt.

And I have a great picture of it. Okay, still slanted, but I may have actually gotten the reds & greys close to accurate — do you know how hard it is to photograph such a graphic quilt?

Ta-Da!

Royal Red Kings Puzzle Quilt Top With Borders

Anyway, there is a regional show here in Kansas City. The Kansas City Regional Quilt Festival.

I was tired of deadlines and not wanting to think about the quilt show, so I bailed for the guild selection of quilts. However, after I brought this beauty out at the guild retreat, I had more than one person come up & tell me this quilt needed to be entered.

The show for judged quilts is first come, first served, it is not juried. There are also guild entries that each guild selects to represent their guilds. I was hesitant when we decided to vote on quilts for the guild, but now I am sticking my neck out there wider & getting this quilt judged! AS long as it makes it in time.

I am heading to fill out the form right now, as soon as I am done with this post. First day for postmark on the quilts is tomorrow, so hopefully the mail here won’t be too slow for my entry to show up late at the headquarters. We do have a slow mail system, but I can’t mail it until Monday afternoon.

Anyway, for those of you keeping reference, the pattern of the center of this quilt is called King’s Puzzle, made by Lois Hatleberg. I contacted her and she is fine with me putting this quilt in the show.

And since I had all the extra dark reds I collected to find the last border, I pieced the backing into also a square. I tried to go from light to dark, inside to out.

Royal Red Kings Puzzle Backing

This quilt will be the first one that I don’t do start to finish. I know I could figure out & work through quilting this quilt on my own, but since I want some form of custom work on this quilt, and I don’t own a long arm, and it takes me enough time loading & unloading when I rent the long arm, that I would get frazzled doing this sort of work in a shop where everyone could see me.

So I am reaching out to Artfully Quilted by Sandy Morgan Cockrum to quilt this quilt. We’re meeting to discuss next week. Here’s hoping that meeting goes as planned on both sides. She does amazing work and may work well for this “modern style” quilt. I do have to figure out what category this is going into. Maybe modern? There aren’t many categories.

In Other Quilt Show news:

The show is also making me extra excited because several #twilter friends are going to come & make a special trip for a meetup! What a great day when I found out they were coming!

If you’re coming, buy tickets through the website rather than in person if you can. Or I assume you can contact me & I can get you the tickets myself once I have them to sell.

The website for the show is http://kcrqf.com

Looking forward to it. Maybe I’ll see YOU there! And if so, maybe you’ll see MY quilt? I hope so!

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36.4 In Search of Taupe

October 26, 2014

I am so glad we have our 2 month deadline for our round robin quilts now, instead of 1 month like before.

For Laura’s round robin center, I have been working on a neutral quilt that has been challenging & stretching me.

I can’t say I have done too many neutral quilts before – maybe just the card trick quilt. And that quilt is more fall colors, without sticking strictly with neutrals.

I have been happy to think about this quilt, but so far, this quilt has generated more EQ7 designs and colorations than ANY other quilt I have done, round robin or not.

I have many different directions to go with this quilt.

Here is the center of the quilt, the original block.

laurasrrcenter

 

Look at the browns, the golds, but also the greys, and hint of blue/bluegrey.

Someone in the journal said there is a theme of pebbles, someone later said a theme of geese.

It immediately made me think of cranes, and the unique opportunity of my hometown.

I used to live in a section of Nebraska, where in March, scores of Sandhill Cranes would roost on their trip back to Canada. Like they ALL decided to fly up through this 60 mile section of land and so it was / is a really big deal there!

cranepictureinspiration

Being late March, usually seeing the cranes happened on cool grey days, fields of plowed corn, you could see hundreds or thousands of cranes taking a breather. Nearing the Platte River.

Anyway, cranes & pebbles & geese & grey March skies was my inspiration for this round of the quilt.

I had my heart set on an eyelash design, which would have been doable, but curves and paper piecing for that quilt, at the size I wanted to do, would have been too much work & struggle.

first idea didnt work eyelash pickledish rrobin

The first idea is what I bought fabric for. I was trying a couple of the original fabrics, inserting a couple of my own.

I went out on a couple of days trying to purchase good fabrics and I fell in love with the dark/medium-dark grey blue pictured above and below, which sorta guided the rest of my color choices.

greybluefusions

And this being smack dab in the medium color scheme, sorta blended in with my second most favorite fabric choice idea.

So again, going out for fabric purchases, and a second round of online purchases directed me to THIS fabric aquisition for my stash. To build up my neutral quilt colors, yeah.

buildinganuetralstash

I finally kept coming back to a light and dark version of taupe to compliment the blue/grey fabric pictured above. This is what I had in EQ7 that pleased me so well. Just enough of a color shift to be interesting, but not enough of a derivation of the original quilt.

I actually saw a glimpse of what I would consider to be ‘the perfect’ fabric compliment to the rest of the design. A japanese fabric line Serenity, Diawabo fabric.  Searching online did not provide me with the exact shade of serenity that I glimsped a small piece of (in a fabric kit) at the quilt shop.

So I am making due with the main part of the borders using blue grey, and finally, one of the fabrics above has the perfect taupe color that will hopefully not detract too far from the colors of the rest of the quilt, but also frame it in the fun “darker” border I want to go with for this round.

Unfortunately the fabric with the taupe isn’t quite as “natural” of a setting as I would hope, but the colors match well enough.

I only wish I could have found the right color of taupe in the serenity line. The one that looked the closest online, in real life turned into much more of a brown shade instead of a taupe shade.

So we are heading toward the green a little bit with this quilt, but only a very very small amount of green. There is a small small smidge of green tint in the focus fabric – which the store clerk at one of the stores said was also from the same serenity fabric line – what a coincidence. So it should match up ok.

I am finally almost halfway done with the middle section of the blocks I finally decided to use.

The blocks are many, but they are fairly simple. And dramatic! Still a lot of work here. I have put undo pressure on myself to “outdo” myself on this round robin quilt, as I have on the ones past.

Here’s a very very narrow, small snippet of what I am working on. None of the finally found taupe in the picture below, but the two shades of grey that I couldn’t ‘unleach’ myself from once I saw them together next to the quilt.

smallsnippetcloseupgrey