Archive for the ‘Quilting’ Category

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40.1 Thoughts on The Creative Place in Spring Hill

July 31, 2016

Hey blog readers, this post is a month back, but finally got pictures uploaded. I anticipate being able to post again this week now that computer pictures have been transferred over. A majority of this was written almost a month ago, and if edited correctly, you wouldn’t notice, but please forgive future & past tense switches that do not make sense if I missed an edit.

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After my March – A – Long this year where I decided to focus on free motion quilting, several miniquilts of mine were quilted in time for our local quilt show in early July.

At the end of June, I was asked to attend a local mini retreat, which was perfect timing for the last bits of quilting needing to be done before the local quilt show.

In Spring Hill, Kansas, in a small downtown area (one block), quilter Kelly Ashton has a building she is calling The Creative Place, a retreat center for crafters.

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Kelly has thought of almost everything a crafter/quilter would want, and frankly, I can’t figure out what she is missing.

I did miss meeting Kelly herself. She came the 2nd night when I was sleeping, and as I was driving away at the end of the retreat, I saw her just outside the front door with the last few remaining retreaters. I did however, see her hexagon presentation to our guild last year (or was it the year before?) and was impressed with her thought process and design even then.

Anyway, this place is great. It’s all one level, so it’s inhabiting like 2 “store fronts” of the downtown Spring Hill area.

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The sewing space is huge. We had 16 – 18 people there One was a grandson who was visiting on one of the days, so mom could get some sewing time in (grandma was at the retreat). We could have had more day-trippers up to 25 may not feel that crowded. We weren’t actively using 7 tables for sewing, so they became quilt design “walls” and holding areas for fans.

But, Kelly also has her own movable design wall (out of PVC pipe), which most of us didn’t need, so sat unused behind one of the main cutting areas. Maybe the 2nd design wall was also hers, or maybe that was someone who brought one.

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What also sat unused, but could have had lots of use, depending on the group, was a huge light table. A large handmade table with lights underneath and plexiglass top that several people could utilize all at the same time.

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What sat underneath the light table, was a GO cutter, but no one also worked with that. I believe it was Kelly’s too, and I believe she wouldn’t have minded we use it either, but that was uncertain to those of us who noticed the cutter in our sewing area.

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In the main sewing area, two bathrooms, with cute decorations, a front area next to the windows, several large ironing surfaces with storage available for use underneath, a back area with lots of local food menus / suggestions, a fridge.

In the front there was also a carpeted sitting area, which would be nice for sitting and chatting with handwork for some of the weekend.

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Moving from the front room, to the left is the kitchen/bathroom/shower/area.  Toward the back of the place were two more bathrooms with step-in showers with handicapped railings.

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Just along the hall were numbered hooks for towels, so each overnight guest wouldn’t get them mixed up, and provide a place for them to dry.

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There were cubbies with extra blankets, and open spaces for people to store their things. Nice ikea shelves with lots of room!

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The dining area is in the same “room” as the kitchen with four smallish tables and four chairs around each.

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Kitchen was stocked with lots of plates, bowls, a brita water pitcher, general kitchen items, two coffee pots, electric water kettle, dishwasher, microwave etc. This was the first retreat that I have personally attended, where we didn’t have “set meals” where we got to go sit and eat together. People could come eat whenever they wanted, they did have to provide the food for ourselves, and there is enough places nearby for those who wanted to eat out.

The ladies coordinated suppers together, first night lasagna, second pulled pork, those meals were sit down with each other, but the rest was “on your own”. Totally different atmosphere than what I’ve seen at other retreats, but totally worth it! More sewing time!

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The only minor downside was the sleeping area. It was very well done, but it was one large room with 16 beds. The only way I am calling it a downside is if there is a majorly loud snorer or if light sleepers have a hard time with noises.

Each bed had its own footrest where the bags/shoes/clothes would be kept. Each bed also had a numbered locker with a key on a bracelet so we could store personal/sensitive things. And on the locker were these low level lights so there could be “walking around” lights during the night that were enough to see to move around at night, but not too distracting for people who were sleeping.

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Behind the sleeping area in the other window store-front was another sitting area with a couch, a couple of more chairs. We had it closed due to the heat. We ended up sewing on one of the hottest weekends of the summer (so far). Fans going constantly. Everywhere.

Also for the person sleeping next to the door to the kitchen area, if the light was on in the kitchen got a blast of light. Light was also a small problem for bathroom trips from the dark sleeping area if people were up and moving around the kitchen, it was sorta jarring due to the bright kitchen area lights. This could potentially be fixed with placement of some mobile kitchen lights that could be turned on during the normal sleeping hours, so the bright overheads could be shut off and the kitchen still be usable. Perhaps they were there and I didn’t see them?

So for those very, very small issues, the rest of the place here is amazing! Highly recommend a group to sign up for this retreat center!

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Across the street was a quilt shop, the Quilted Sunflower, who opened up special on Friday night. Saturday afternoon, the group took a couple of hours going to a neighboring town’s quilt shop in Paola. I missed out on the trip into town because I was on a roll and I have been downsizing my stash a little this year. I did go to the Quilted Sunflower in Spring Hill.

And there are several quilt shops within 30-40 minute drive, for people out of the KC area to use.

This place was just so wonderful, I posted in another retreat’s FB page in case they need to move or want to add an extra retreat. Price seemed reasonable, the experience was lovely! Would do it again in a heartbeat.

Personally, I knew 5 of the ladies sewing with the group that was there, the rest were new to me, but some of them familiar – probably seen them at local quilt shows etc! The lady across from me brought a pattern and fabric for these cute strawberry blocks she was making! In strawberry jam jars! I didn’t realize she wasn’t staying on Sunday and so I didn’t get to say good bye.

Anyway, I highly recommend this place to stay. Reasonable price, lots of thoughtful decisions made on Kelly’s part make this place a really special place for quilters and other crafters to stay as a retreat center!🙂

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39.0 First BOM – Stained Glass

January 17, 2016

For the brand new year, I happened upon a brand new BOM that I decided to join up and work on.

I love the stained glass look for quilts, and this one just spoke to me this time.

A designer for which I know little about, lives in Europe, I have bought one of her patterns before and the quilt is on my list to do, Ula Lenz has made the Ray of Hope quilt in hexagon style.

I have already completed the first block, here are some of the pieces I was working on.

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I had a bright bag of orange, purple, pink batik scraps that I knew just “went together”. I think someone from my guild donated them to me at the last retreat a year ago. I had kept the fabrics separate from the rest of my stash, hoping to find a use for them.

I remembered seeing these fabrics recently, so I located an appropriately dark batik that I had bought to use for some purpose that matched these pretty batiks.

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I have already cut out the border fabric for these blocks, the way Ula has us do the quilt is to make sashing and fun border wonky stars in between each of the hexagon blocks.

There are many color ways that would look fantastic for this quilt. I have luckily got the first block done, so I hope that I will be able to remind myself to download her next BOM when it’s posted at the beginning of each month.

It’s free. As you can see, each of the hexagons will be done in three sub blocks, and several of them have different amounts of seams on them.

Paper piecing doesn’t scare me.

Here’s the pretty block without the border pieces.

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I hope I can keep enough of these fabrics in the quilt. I may try to find another light fabric to help with the contrast a little more on future blocks.

And here’s the block with border pieces. So now it can be sewn in square.

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38.9 Quilt Accomplishments for 2015 – the Year of Scraps

January 15, 2016

I would like to recap my 2015 quilt related accomplishments. Many of them are tops, I really did little to no Free Motion Quilting during the year of 2015. I did have three quilts quilted during the year.

Some of the blog posts I was about a month or two behind. Usually I am finding myself sewing or surfing with my extra time, or board game playing, or football watching, or video game playing, or playing solitaire on my phone, or chatting with ladies from 4 other quilting states at the big quilt show this year.

You get the picture. Distractions abound.

From the beginning of the year, I did spend a lot of my weekends quilting, even if they weren’t documented immediately afterwards.

I will try to recap my quilt life 2015, using some familiar pictures, some new.

I started off with the last round of the Twilter Round Robin quilt I was working on for Diane.

Round Robin Dianes Twilt On quilt with Darla borders

I did the last bargello style border (green to blue waves). I drafted this from graph paper. I made more work for myself than I needed to because of the multilevel greens that I added.

I completed the quilt top for fellow quilter (and also once “quilt” podcaster) who lost her husband suddenly in the fall of 2014.

Darla and Ruthanns quilt top

Looking back through my archives, I can’t believe that I forgot to blog about this quilt. It was meant as a nice surprise for Ruthann. She wanted something “green and sciencey”. I had seen this quilt in a book I got in 2014. I had emailed a bunch of other people in our group, most of which remembered Ruthann, but not all of them had.

I had a list of the strip sizes I needed, and instead of the other people sending me “completed blocks” I asked if they could send strips and/or strip sets. I was amazed at what was sent on this quilt.

And I did lots of extra work, cutting up and only using a portion of what was presewn  for me just so I could have a lot of variation on the quilt.

I completed the top in early January, and completed the finished quilt in May, after our meetup with Jackie from Sew Excited Quilts quilted this quilt (and one other) for me.

ruthann and teddy healing quilts

I had overestimated the size of making 5 full DNA strips, so the last one became a “bed runner” which was quilted separately by me at home.

In Feb, at the annual guild retreat, I finally finished my borders and my backing for my Royal Red King’s Puzzle quilt.

Royal Red Kings Puzzle Quilt Top With Borders

In March, I translated the quilting pattern from my Dancing ribbons quilt to ceramics. I need to mount this.

dahlia plate after glazing

I also finished the borders on my weave quilt after figuring out how to do the ends.

Circular ends

I brought a small quilt I had worked on a few years ago, a disappearing four patch quilt, to the lady who was quilting my Royal Red quilt. Sandy from Artfully Quilted did the honor for me for the red quilt, and also works on donation quilts for the local hospital. I was happy to donate my disappearing four patch, even though I was originally going to practice free motion quilting on it.

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I think sometime I worked on the back for the weave quilt, I didn’t finish it, but I got some pieces together for it. I usually piece my backings so I don’t buy the extra large fabrics that often. But it takes some time.

April I made some things for the quilt show, in addition to another quilt block for another quilty podcaster.

galaxy star pattern via quilters cache

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I also received my fantastic Round Robin quilt back and in the squeak of time, got arrangements for this quilt to be in the regional festival. I think I was on top of the world one minute of the day, and I was crying in disappointment the other part of the day. This quilt, didn’t almost make it into the show, and I am blessed that things either worked out for it to be there, or someone gave up a spot or something else happened to allow me to have the quilt in the show. Anyhow I can only take credit for the center, some of the fabrics, and the tiny outside border.

Darlas round robin quilt finished top

May was the finish for the show, getting all these quilts ready with labels, sleeves, and everything prior to June. It was also time for me to get extra wound up for inviting some friends to Kansas City area.

May I also met with Jackie for our (now annual sorta) sewing day at her studio!

Royal Red styled on porch swing

June was our regional quilt festival, and fantastic meetup with friends and with guildmates, seeing other friends’ quilts and making new friends.

twilter meetup five twilters at barbecue

three of seven twilters entwined

In July I finalized my “watermelon dresden” pattern for myself, and worked on getting my studio organized, and set myself up for the fall of scrappy quilts.

water melon dresden version 2

string quilt small

August, I was getting myself organized and sewing all the 16 patches that eventually became my Arkansas Crossroads quilt. And getting more strings for the hashtag quilt swap.

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And I was starting to make shoo flys for the disappearing shoo fly quilt.

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I also took some time out to make a few small blocks for other small projects. These went to different quilts for different projects, but are both definitely “my” style.

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I made my hashtag blocks to be sent out to the twilter swap.

string hastag blocks to send

And received some different ones in return.

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Then the end of the year I started sewing together all the scrappy pieces I was working on in the fall.

shoo fly top as a table topper scrap quilt

I think I just blogged about unsewing and resewing my Winslow’s Corners quilt, which took up some of my November time.

Winslows Corners Quilt with good corners

I experimented but haven’t yet committed on a low contrast, but high saturation scrap chevron quilt. (still in many smaller pieces)

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One weekend I looked at all the scraps I had left over from Ruthann’s quilt in the spring and put together a different top for picnicking.

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And on Thanksgiving day, got my Watermelon Dresden quilt layout figured out with actual fabric pieces I am working on.

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Currently I am in a “small battle” (with myself) as I ran out of the background fabric needed to make the quilt. The shop that sold it to me in November, I called, and they don’t have the same fabric anymore. I am working out how to do it since I started some of the border pieces already in one fabric.

Actually, the quilt will have lots of background space due to how I set the border pieces. I figure there will be lots of room for background quilting on this quilt.

And since I am writing this in January, I will hold off on my latest quilt block project. That is actually finished – for January anyway.

Oh… and in April, just before all the mess for the quilt show started, I attempted to quilt my Samurai Sudoku quilt. But I was having a bad day, things weren’t lining up right. I haven’t yet told myself to rip out and start over on the quilting, but I almost have. I have been avoiding the longarm rental since I have to make a decision on this quilt that I will not like to make right now.

upclose picture of samurai sudoku quilt on longarm

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38.8 Winslow’s Corners quilt an Arkansas Crossroads pattern

January 12, 2016

The end of 2015 was surrounded by creating quilt tops of the “scrap” genre.

Quilts with lots of different fabrics in them, sometimes color controlled, sometimes completely random.

I readily obtain many 2.5 inch blocks by my “cut out strips” method of using fabric for projects. I know the value in 2.5 inch squares and so tend to cut squares into this shape when I have no set purpose for these squares.

 

I have posted about this top a few times already, but I did finish the top at my recent Arkansas retreat.

winslows corners quilt top backwards corners

I was trugging along, trying to get everything sewn down, I knew how I wanted the borders to match the rest of the quilt.

As you may be able to see the quilt is a simple idea.

  • Alternating 16 patches filled with all the scrappy 2.5 patches I sewn together earlier the past summer
  • Alternating x blocks made of 4 album blocks “pointed” inward together
  • Borders consisting of each piece being a “half album” block with the two corners together

Three pieces of winslows corners quilt

This is how I organize this quilt in my head when making it.

I have noticed it is starting to become “popularized” – aka I have been seeing it on some websites, or mainly the quilting group on FB as a single block, rather than 2 blocks of different styles.

winslows corners alternate quilt block

Either way works, it depends on how the maker would prefer to work on the designs.

I made my album blocks by a simple paper piecing method. Very easy to paper piece.

In fact, I would recommend this quilt to anyone who wanted to learn a little bit about paper piecing. Not too many tiny paper pieces, the quilt seems satisfying in scope when done.

In any event, while at my November retreat, I was in a rush to complete the quilt and I didn’t consider “row placement”.

I ended up with my X blocks (four album blocks) on the outside corners. All of them.

original top winlsows corners double corner

So the very corners are these silly little hour glass type things.

I finished the quilt top, but I didn’t really like the corners of my Winslow’s Corners all that much.

But then later that month, I was thinking. And thinking.

I figured out a relatively easy way to correct the corners on Winslow’s corners.

Since both edges ended up being off, if I would remove the last row on one side, move it to the other side, scooting it down some, remove both small borders.

winslows corners plan for moving last row

I had some “downtime” aka non-internet non-machine sewing time planned for the Thanksgiving holiday, I could unpick all the edges, get the quilt prepared, and then just had to do a few quick seams after black friday.

So that’s what I did, picked off one border, took a whole row including the border, scootched it over to the opposite side of the quilt.

winslows corners border removed block missing

The left over border on my “left” in the picture above is good since I removed the “offending row” and put it on the right.

And scootched it down by one block.

winslows corners close up of last row

You can see from here, I still had to pick out the extra X block, and I had to quick make an extra 16 patch block.

But only minor changes from this point and now the quilt top has much better border corners.

No funny corners on my Winslow’s Corners quilt.

Winslows Corners Quilt with good corners

Did I mention why I am calling the quilt Winslow’s Corners? My annual fall retreat is in Winslow, Arkansas. And the quilt pattern is sometimes named Arkansas Crossroads.

 

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38.2 Winslow Corners quilt idea

August 9, 2015

I have had the privilege of sewing many days after work this week. Mindless sewing mainly from leaders & enders I was putting into place from a while ago.

After my “turn-it-around” sewing room organization from a week ago, I have been motivated by the fact that I can actually watch my computer screen for entertainment instead of constantly being turned around to see what’s been on the screen.

I have been motivated by taking an old reality series that I have watched most seasons of, rewatching them years later. I forget easily, so this time it’s like watching ‘new-old’ television.

So I have some distraction that is not too distracting and that, in turn, is motivating me to keep working and working. Almost as if it was March-A-Long again.

Anyway, my leaders & enders are resulting in 16 patches of the cool color family.

16 patch blocks

So far, I have mindlessly sewn 30 of them.

I had made a “pattern” for this quilt a while ago and have had this idea for a scrap quilt for a while. I don’t need 30 of the 16 patches for the finished quilt. Here’s the quilt.

arkansas crossing x and o quilt

I have a light grey and want to use some of the extra neutrals from the quilt I made for Laura for the alternate blocks.

I don’t have the pattern centered or bordered or anything, but yes, I have printed out the paper pieced X blocks, aka album blocks.

I have heard several names for this quilt:

  • X’s and O’s
  • 16 patch and album blocks
  • Arkansas Crossroads

I do have a small history with quilting in Arkansas now. I travel there every fall (so far) for a quilting retreat. Northeast Arkansas, not incredibly far away from the KC area.

A tiny town called Winslow, there is a couple who run a B & B cabins (Sky-Vue) that host 16 quilters who come & sew for an extended weekend. If you have followed me any time in the fall, you have heard me talking about it.

Anyway, I want to make a quilt with a name something like Winslow Corners or possibly Sky-Vue crossing.

Using these no-thinking blocks out of my ever growing scrap pile.

That’s been a vague direction I have been quilting in this week.

I haven’t started on the paper piecing portion, but now have 30 of the 16 patch blocks. It’s so easy to make these 16 patch blocks.

Surely more of these blocks will go somewhere else if I run out of  paper piecing blocks (x blocks).

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I have also made some random half square triangles in sets of 4 that I want to match with my pinwheel blocks someday.

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I also have a small sewing mat for my sewing foot pedal.

I have a wandering foot, but I like to elevate the back of my foot and sew more evenly. I frequently have a phone book by and/or under my sewing machine foot pedal.

I just made this late this afternoon, so I haven’t yet tried it out. I have the non stick gripper on the front and back, and to give the pad some “oomph” to simulate raising the foot pedal some, I have a piece of folded over fabric that is folded over two small batting scraps inside.

It’s really batting, fabric, then a binding stitched around that whole block. Then I have a ‘stopper’ of rolled up batting sewn down in a pocket on the top.

I was inspired by this tutorial, but did not follow it directly. I read it a few weeks ago and then when I gotten the “gist of it” I created from vague memory today.

Anyway, it’s been a week of happy sewing, I hope this post finds you well. No matter if you meet in the crossroads of arkansas or elsewhere.

Still marinating about my “next biggest bestest quilt” for the quilt show in 2 years. Glad to not really think about it too hard yet.

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38.1 New Beginnings And Cycles

August 2, 2015

Hey! Last time I wrote I was a month ago about my diary of the KCRQF. A month and a half ago. The end of my day 2 was looking at the quilts of the Beatles, and my quick lecture class. Day 3 was my volunteering day where I gave out wristbands to fathers for Father’s Day, and then helping in the booth with 3 other people, which really meant talking to guild members, going to get food, a conversation with my Dad (for who knows how long) and then getting straight on shots of guild quilts.

Later, I may share my pictures & description of the Beatles quilts. Today, as I write, I want to start new, fresh.

Quilt Cycle Cathedral Teal with labels

I am really enjoying this stage of my quilting cycle. At the beginning.

I have noticed that yes, deadlines get quilts done, gets quilts finished, provides me with a much needed focus. I do so much better with a focus. Even if it is a temporary focus. If I want to get things complete, I have a deadline, made up or real, and stick to it. Yes, I like the focus of finishing!

But at the beginning of a quilt cycle, there are so many possibilities. So much potential.

  • What fabrics do I use?
  • What pattern do I use?
  • How will I offset the blocks from each other?
  • Do I want to design something new? Traditional?
  • Who is it for?
  • What size quilt do I want to make?

My questioning mind loves to go back to the beginning sometimes, but I am not alone.

Quilters have many UFO’s, we like to restart, to re-cycle to the beginning of the process.

I have been considering going back to the beginning again with several quilts, or starting new.

Why? Well for one, I completed my deadline. The huge quilt show we had a month and a half ago was a great deadline. Great AND stressful both!

For two, I am wondering, what quilt will be the next best quilt to create for the next huge quilt show?

For three, I reorganized my sewing room. And it’s like halfway done.

For four, I have LOTS of scraps that I would like to use up, cut down, make clean.

For right now, that’s the main motivation for new beginnings.

My wall of fabric (one large ‘bookcase’) I changed from my left to my right.

fabric wall

 

This frees up my cutting area so much. I have had a limited amount of cutting space that I could use. Actually, I am using the same space as before, but now don’t have a large area nearby to butt up against.

new cutting area

I also have a large enough desk I can watch streaming video and press or cut on the table if I desire!

computer desk and small ironing pad

Which will be something nice. I may even bring my sewing machine back into my sewing room, as currently it’s at the kitchen table. Will be hard to do computer & sewing both, but may be possible.

Possibilities are opening!

Speaking of possibilities and scraps and new/old things, I have gotten out a few fabric pieces the last month.

First was my “watermelon dresden”, inspired by Jenny Doan’s visit to our guild several years ago, when we were all doing the jelly roll race quilts, I did jelly roll dresden pieces.

watermelon dresden

And I even came up with a pattern for it, that I don’t believe I have shared with you all.

water melon dresden version 2

How pretty.

And then for a few things more scrappy, I had a couple very small paper pieced blocks we did with the guild that I thought would be perfect for small strings.

string quilt small

I worked on this last weekend at my friend’s house at our last sunday sewing day for a while – her schedule is changing.

The finished piece is pretty small. about a 12″ block or so. May need to make more of these.

And I have been wanting to do an Arkansas Crossing quilt with scrappy cool tones for quite a while now.

16 patches for scrap quilt arkansas crossroads

So I finally have some mindless sewing to work on. Which for me, right now, is fantastic!

And oh yeah, I have some pinwheels against white that I don’t know what to do with. So I am making more and going to eventually donate for a kids quilt for the memorial hospital in Lawrence.

extra squares for pinwheels

For these I have been putting 2 charms (5 inch squares) right sides together & sewing around the edges to cut in quarters and press open later.

I also have been using my new phone for pictures exclusively and haven’t gotten my normal camera out for the last month. So new beginnings there. I wish I was better able to focus that more quickly. The better thing is that this phone with camera has the same megapixels as my point & shoot camera did, AND this one doesn’t take 30 seconds to reset after one picture, it is able to move much more quickly between pictures!

Anyway, thanks for joining me on the beginning of a cycle again! What a great feeling to find lost projects and to work on new things!

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38.0 Kansas City Regional Quilt Festival – Diary – Day 2 – Part 2 – Judged quilts and Categories

July 6, 2015

The weekend of June 19th – 21 was the Kansas City Regional Quilt Festival otherwise known as #KCRQF.

I have decided I had so much to say about the quilt show that I would write down in diary format what I went through on different days of the festival, share possibly a few stories, and pretend to take you along with me to the festival.

I am in the middle of covering Saturday, my main day of seeing the festival. My last post was about the guild quilts, and my post about that was the friday twilter meetup day.

So after taking the pictures of all the guild quilts I was ready to go do something else, look at vendors maybe. But when I got back up to the front, two ladies with sheets and golf pencils were there, ready to ask if I would help in determining viewers choice for all the guild quilts.

How could I decline?

So I went back through trying to decipher all what quilt fits into what category. Because the quilts on this side were organized by guild, this made it much harder to pick a favorite. What if my actual favorite was in the back and I failed to go back and see the quilt again?

Organization of Guild Quilts & Quilt Show Categories

Also some categories had only a few entrants, and some categories had many many entrants.

The categories for this show were:

  • Pieced Hand Quilted
  • Pieced Machine Quilted
  • Applique Hand Quilted
  • Applique Machine Quilted
  • Mixed Techniques Hand Quilted
  • Mixed Techniques Machine Quilted
  • Innovative

There were only a few hand quilted items. VERY impressive, but most of the hand quilted quilts were only competing against a few other quilts. These were hard to find in the show.

They were exquisitely done, don’t get me wrong, but perhaps all the handquilting needs to be in a category by itself so there are more quilts to be judged against?

Just a thought.

The Mixed Techniques Machine quilted category has about 100 quilts, the Pieced Machine Quilted category has about 200 quilts, and Innovative has about 30 quilts.

It’d be interesting to see a different way for the show to be broken up.

Perhaps the unevenness of the quilts is due to the fact that we were not limited by how many quilts in each category we could put into the show for the guild side of the show. I know my two quilts went in as the same category, so they competed against each other.

Anyway, the quilt I put down for viewers best of show I somehow failed to get the name of the quilter, so I cannot attribute this quilt to anyone correctly right now.

applique quilt best of show for me

applique quilt best of show for me

I think I was mesmerized by the crystals on the borders. Blurry picture below. Oops.

blurry picture of borders

blurry picture of borders

There were many quilts, and it was fun to run back and forth down the isles, making quick marks on the side of the paper to see which quilts would win in each category. Unfortunately I didn’t take track of my voting sheet for posterity.

After voting for the quilts, it was already lunch time, and the remaining twilters were meeting for lunch.

We had decided this time not to go “off campus” for lunch because parking the day before was hard. So we went back to the connecting Sheraton hotel and had a fancy lunch with hardly any other guests.

No pictures of this event, what were we thinking??

Anyway, it was nice to sit and learn about the private lives of the twilters who came by and to share some thoughts about etsy, quilting, traveling, home life, past lives. I think this was the lunch where I was more quiet & listened a lot. It was so neet just being with friends we haven’t really seen, but have had a chance connecting with online in many different ways.

I still had vendors to see & shop, the judged quilts to photograph, and the Beatles quilts to go view before we left. AND I wanted a picture of the 3 of us who worked on the round robin quilt. We were mostly separate for the afternoon, I went off on my own again, met up with Jackie & her friend Jackie occasionally on the vendor floor, Tami & Valerie went off to rest … it was a big trip and there is a lot of walking involved here.

three of seven twilters entwined

I didn’t take too many pictures of vendors because that was the only possible restriction for pictures for the show. Some vendors rightfully so don’t want people to take pictures of their quilts and patterns. Not all of them, but some, and that’s understandable.

I walked by several vendors I knew from other shows, some I had spoken to before, some I had not. One was Caitlyn who used to be in our guild who opened up her own modern fabric store that she even rented space from a local downtown area for about a year and a half. It was nice to see her again!

Also I met with Nikki who helps with the Quilts of Valor and is a member of like 2-3 guilds (not mine though) and we have become facebook friends and have similar tastes in quilts. She keeps telling me I should join the Modern guild. If they met in the afternoon, I’d consider it.

I zeroed in on a few vendor items I wanted to come back to later. Then onto the judged quilts.

How the Judged Quilts worked in KCRQF

The judged quilts were open to anyone who wanted to enter their quilts into the show who got in their entry in time with enough space.

I do not know if they cut off certain categories early, but entrants had the entire month of March to enter their quilts for the show. I was seeing they were still requesting submissions at the end of March.

There were no jury on the quilts, it seemed to be “first come, first served”. Each entrant could only enter one quilt per category. And you didn’t have to be a member of any of the guilds to be entered into the show. Or even local. Most were though.

The same 7 categories were in the judged quilts as were for the guild quilts above. Again, it seemed like there were not as many hand quilted items as machine quilted items. A few categories had less than 10 entrants.

This side was also less entered than the guild side. I was glad to see the guild quilts strong, but surprised how few people entered their quilts for judging. Perhaps we all want to get the quilts at the show, but don’t want to know what the judges have to say about the quilts.

My quilt was WAY down at the back of the show, at the end, right near the food. So people would have to see it if they were heading towards the food at the back of the show from the judged quilt section.

DSC00582

I love it, but was surprised how dark the quilt seemed compared to the other quilts around it.

My guild members were great at telling me they thought it could have won something. It is definitely dramatic looking. I tried not to spend too much time hovering around my quilt. Unfortunately, it was hanging next to a truly innovative quilt. One I kept seeing people go up to and exclaiming how good it was! And I liked it too.

I had put my quilt in innovative and should have put it into another category, pieced machine quilted. I really thought it would have more chance in this category. I decided early & quickly to put it into the show, and then thought later about the category a little more.

Anyway, here are some of the judged quilts I saw & took pictures of. Again in gallery form. I was way less diligent at getting names on all the quilts here, so instead I am just going to label all the quilts the same. More about the show in the next post.