Posts Tagged ‘applique’

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40.0 Guild Challenge Quilt from Coloring book inspiration

June 19, 2016

Oy!

I took a few months off quilting to reset. Something about taking all my closet out, moving my ironing board and design wall, only having limited time to do outside tasks before blazing hot temps take hold – where we are now! – and family emergencies during another month, offset me from quilting until getting this challenge quilt ready for the June local guild meeting.

I’ve been a guild member since 2009, and this is the first “guild challenge quilt” I have participated in that we have had of this kind.

Ok, so we were given a challenge fabric and told, keep it small (about 2 feet), add one off white solid, add one other solid, and the rest is up to us.

challengefabric.jpg

So I purchased some variations of solid fabrics.

challenge quilt fabrics

I had a thought about recreating either a fabric design, or a notebook cover, or a coloring book I picked up a while ago.

coloring book inspiration

Between this and a frequently added Pintrest board of gradient colors, I decided to try to recreate the front design.

coloring book inspiration colored diagram

I drew a quick sketch, then one morning, I sat down with some rulers and circles, and drew out and then colored a design based off this colored pencil design. And proceeded to color it in.

colored sketch gradient challenge quilt

I drew the design actually on the heat and bond paper that gave me a “real life” feel of the size of each piece I was adding to the quilt design.

This design turned out very “arty” for my taste. I think I teased a portion of this somewhere else.

close up at drawing

I used the gradients of having several different colors of teal as the focus, and the little accent pieces of yellow, orange and pink to pop in and out of the piece.

Setting up the quilting part, I started looking at videos and how best to approach this. I was essentially setting up a large applique quilt, but have decided in many recent times that I feel like I have very little patience for handwork. I needed to do this quilt raw edge.

I remembered a video Leah Day did of a piecing applique quilt from several years ago.

If you don’t swing back to her video, I used the ideas of a few major concepts that later helped me with my quilt.

  1. Leah showed the upward direction on the back of her pieces so she could piece her quilt correctly again. This helped me get the right orientation.
  2. Leah had an outline behind her fabric she was pasting her quilt onto.
  3. Leah had flipped her design right to left to get the correct orientation on the front. This was something I should have remembered on my own, but actually did not.
  4. Leah suggested cutting and placing strips down on the quilt, line at a time. Which was a slow way, but it got me organizing my quilt in such a way, I didn’t get any part mixed up with any other part.

Ok so I flipped the design around and put the new flipped design on another piece of heat n bond paper. I also eliminated the very “darkest” teal. In matching it up in a line with the other pieces, it had the wrong tone. It was darker, but it had a little bit more brown or grey tinted into the fabric color that didn’t “pop” with the rest of the quilt color.

flipped over outline of piece on heat bond paper

Actually eliminating the one fabric made it easier. I had done a proof of concept piece, and as much as I liked the tweezers and setting the pieces down, I actually liked having slightly larger pieces in my finished piece. It makes it more likely to be done when this is all said and done if the pieces are a little larger.

proof of concept piece

The darkest teal in this piece above, I took out.

my key after ripping off fabric 5

Then I had one more challenge that I myself had created for myself. My original design was on heat N bond, which would mean that if I added pieces to my finished quilt and ironed them down, that I would heat n bond my “design” to the table.

Luckily, I had all the small quilts I have been free motion quilting during the month of March. I took a quilt sandwich of similar size, placed that on the table, and then took a piece of freezer paper, traced the outlines onto the freezer paper from my heat n bond design, then heated up the freezer paper “pattern” onto the back of the quilt sandwich as a barrier for the table.

I had traced the outlines of my design several times before really getting started on the fabric part of my quilt.

When everything was ready, I took some close up pictures of my design for reference.

close up of outline piece on heat bond

And once I had the whole quilt photographed, I carefully cut up the patterns out of the heat n bond paper, one strip at a time.

cut up heat bond pieces

It was so nice using solid fabrics for this quilt, I didn’t have to worry about right side and wrong side. I applied each piece of my template to a piece of numbered fabric. I tried to consider the raw edge quality of the quilt, and attempted to make the main line go along the grain of the fabric if possible.

heat bond pieces reassembled back

After applying the pattern to the fabric, I carefully cut the fabric around each piece, giving a little bit of a seam allowance to each side evenly. I was going to have to slightly overlap the pieces with the neighboring pieces. If each of these pieces didn’t match up with my original designed sizes, that was ok, as long as the overlaps made sense with the rest of the quilt.

heat bond pieces layout front

And here was another section cut out and then flipped over.

heat bond pieces long section

heat bond sections pieces long section front

And a different section that was meant to be “interrupted by another piece”. –  Shown from the back.

heat bond sections two sections assembled back

As I completed each section (slowly), I carried them over from my working space to my ironing board.

layout of several sections on ironing board

After cutting out to size all the sections of this quilt, I picked a section to start with, and using the (faint) outline on the freezer paper as a guideline for placement, got my section organized the way I wanted it. Then hit it with a hot iron.

gradient challenge first piece

The adding of each section became more and more fun. As long as I was paying attention to what goes under what piece, this quilt seemed to work out well. You may be able to see the faint outline under the off-white fabric.

I ended up using tweezers to help me place the “right” fabrics on front or on the back. For me, my general guideline was to have the lighter fabrics on the bottom, except in cases where that was an “alternating design”. I also tried to keep yellow on the bottom in places I would also be able to chose that too.

assembling the pieces raw edge and pattern

I originally had a different blue piece for the top corner that matches the “eye” I have on the right side. After doing all these pieces and strips on these smaller sections of lighter blues, I decided I wanted to add a little bit of color to the background. Adding even more of the quilt pieces to the quilt below.

assembling the pieces, more sections on fabric

In addition, I had a bright patterned yellow fabric that I tried to put into the quilt that would fit in the section next to the blue as part of a “sun” piece. Boy was it bright and distracting. I laid the cutout piece next to that section of the quilt, and it was too distracting. It felt like a “sun” part, but it just wasn’t working.

I did find a very light yellow and forgetting to flip the diagram over, I ended up placing the very very light back of that piece on the bottom right corner opposite my blue piece. It’s there, but hard to even notice, it’s so light.

And then I put the “front side” of the really light yellow to make sure I got a feeling of “offwhite” for the challenge portion of the quilt. It was a very lightly mottled tone-on-tone that fully reads as solid.

finished piece all heat and bond only

This is actually where I am with this quilt right now. It needs sewn down currently.

I did get it spray basted to a piece of batting and backing is the blue fabric in the “eye of the bird”. It reminds me of a bird with arms and a ball in his hand that trumpets out the front.

Sorta kinda but not really.

As I sew these pieces down, I will also quilt through the quilt sandwich at the same time. This will save me a step.

I was able to show off what I have finished to the guild on Tuesday, which was the “soft” due date for the quilt. We had quite a few people bring their challenge quilts to the guild meeting. Mine was not finished, but I was able to hold it up for all to see what I was working on, and to my knowledge, none of the pieces fell off in transport to or from the meeting.

This is going into our quilt show held on July 8th & 9th. Assuming I can actually sew it down & bind it in time. I may even use the challenge fabric in the binding!

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34.1 Dragons Unleashed

February 22, 2014

My dragon was so scary on the gold, that an evil wizard decided to encase him in in wood.

dragon wood border

A valiant knight heard tale of this viscous dragon. He set off on a quest to try to slay him.

knight sihlouette

First the knight had to find his way among the circular maze of the Celts.

celtic knot original placement

The dragon then encased himself in a wall of fire & flame.

celtic section and dragon section

The knight, confused, warm, walking in circles, called upon the angels for help.

celtic angels

A castle in the background will be calling for help and the success of the knights’ travels.

Stay tuned for that portion of the story after these messages (other projects)

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33.6 Completed Fans & Bows Quilt

January 4, 2014

I completed this quilt ON New Year’s Day. So technically I have a finish for 2014.

According to someone … other people … what you do on New Years will be what you do the rest of the year.

So I guess this year is the year of the quilt finish. LOL.

Well, you’ve already seen some of the in progress pictures for this quilt. Here’s the completed thing.

finished fans and bows quilt 2014

And now you can see why it’s called Fans & Bows.

The red corners mimic bows, but I did hand tie some bows to go in the middle of the quilt at each border.

The lace is really pretty, I stretched it to get around the corners and with the bow & lace embellishment, this will be more of a ‘look at me’ quilt than a “let’s sit under me” quilt. But that’s ok.

The evolution of this quilt from the VERY start – March 15 2009, the second weekend of my quilting journey, I designed & pieced this top.

fans and bows quilt top sewn together

And I saw all the white, and thought, cool – quilting space. But not yet.

So the following National Quilting day 2010 I made up some fans I had in the back of the butterfly book I bought back then.

fans and bows initial sketch

Well the design was from a month earlier. Here are the fan pieces.

fans and bows layout

And after I first stitched them down, this was my first fusible applique project.  That I used a ‘decorative stitch’ to sew with my brother.

fans and bows initial stitch of fans

All four fans changed the look of the quilt quite a bit.

fans and bows fans stitched down

The next few months in 2010, I decided on the blank corners that now needed something.

fans and bows deciding on the bows

I spent some time making the back out of pieced fabrics. Strange, but I was excited about the back. This was Feb of 2011.

fans and bows back of quilt

And then I fused the quilt and set the whole thing aside.

With the exception of finding some lace that I thought would compliment the quilt perfectly. Bought the lace in 2012, when going embellishment crazy for my periodic table quilt.

And once settling down on my cabinet machine Aquata, I decided to quilt her – finally. In early December of 2013.

The momentum gathered by free motion quilting her, lead me to sew the lace once I had time.

fans with quilting and lace

Here is a better picture of the center quilting (before I attached the lace)

center of quilt quilting close up before lace

Another picture of the corners quilting pre-lace.

quilting close up of corner of quilt

And the back side of the quilt with the quilting and a few thread nests that I decided not to pick out.

up close quilting fans and bows of back of quilt

And the quilting showing up on the corner design on the back.

back of quilt after quilting corner

And a few more quilting with lace pictures. center.

quilting with lace attached

Corner with lace

corner quilting of quilt after lace applied

Hope you enjoy. Most of the quilting was done with similar colors to the top, but not all. I know I could have done a steadier job if I had sketched out beforehand a little bit on the FMQ, but I was excited with how it was flowing.

I was really glad to finally not do a pantograph or an overall design. Currently, I am thinking I need to work on custom work more, but when using the long arm, I don’t – because my time there is limited.

I can’t believe how old of a UFO this quilt was, and I am so glad to get it finished!

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31.7 Little Star – from UFO to FO to Applique to Beaded

July 29, 2013

I can’t believe all the blog posts that have been coming out from me lately and none of them have really had to do much with what I’ve been sewing.

Which yes, I have been doing actually. A good thing for a break, and a good thing to be back in the middle of these UFO unfinished object things.

Of course, I haven’t really touched my machine in a few weeks, so I’m trying to be creative, think outside of the ‘using a machine’ for quilting steps.

This post, I will discuss my ‘fun’ in finding out that a finished object wasn’t exactly finished.

Some of you may have seen the pictures on twitter or something already.

Little Star went through some ‘stellar evolution’ over the course of the last month.

My little star was a bonus quilt, an orphaned block I purchased.  I bordered, quilted, and then created a single applique star in the middle.

It sat this way as a finished object (FO) for 6 months or so, and I kept looking at the quilt, thinking, huh, I don’t like the center quilting (heading toward the center star) very much, although very happy with the rest of the quilting.

I asked myself if I wanted to put it in the show, and I wasn’t sure.

Until about 3 days before the quilt show.

mini star quilt

Then I had an idea of “a fast fix” since I really didn’t feel like spending time gluing down applique pieces and then hand appliqueing them. I decided to “go look for heat-set / iron-on stars”.

So I drove to town, listened to a few quilting podcasts (starting to catch up much closer to on time now, helps that it’s summer and episodes are a little sparse with peeps), and located all the stars that I could at Hancock fabrics. I looked all through the jewelery section, and all through the buttons, and the iron on stars, and I purchased several types of things to try.

And then went to Michael s, and they had some silver sequins, in addition some iron-on metal-type stars.  And then I was in the bead section, and found some fantastic looking yellow stripey beads.  This got my brain thinking beads, to know to check my bead box when I got home, as I purchased a TON of types of beads and trims for the Periodic Sprial quilt (linked post only shows about 1/10th of my choices).

Coming home a few days (a day?) before the quilt show, I started arranging and making choices about the gold iron-ons, blue iron-ons and the silver tiny iron-ons. And set to work with the iron, a pressing fabric.

The yellow iron on stars stayed very well. The blue ones kept falling off no matter how heavily I pressed and pressed.

I was confused because the blue and yellow pieces were essentially the same brand, but apparently, the gold stars had a better glue than the blue stars.

But for that night they stayed on the quilt.

And these little metal iron-on stars had a few things that made them different (notable).

I was in such a hurry I didn’t get any progress pictures at all, but here’s how they worked.

The entire sheet of stars had a fusible webbing type backing on the bottom of the star, and the whole thing had a clear plastic sheet on the top of the star.

The idea was to cut out the star from the entire sheet of stars, and then peel off the webbing from the back, leaving the clear plastic top.  Which seemed odd. And then you had a scrap fabric covering over the clear plastic sheet, on top of the little metal star, on top of a webbing which now only appeared directly below the star and star alone.

Press down on the scrap fabric, hold for X amount of seconds, then remove the plastic from the top (when cool).

And by golly, these things worked. Worked well. I did lose one in a ‘folding accident’, but one only.

So I had all these stars ready to go. Day of the show I had a label I was pinning down to the back (no time to hand sew it in) and the blue stars kept falling off.

And I was going to try to get to the set up for the show, I knew I would be needed. But, I had like 45 minutes before I wanted to be there, and so I ’emergency appliqued’ my blue stars down.  I went for all the inside points of the star. Not easy to poke through. Not my best applique effort, but enough to keep any falling off.

You know how hard it is to applique thick pieces of fabric not meant to be sewn through, while they are not staying on the quilt, while you’re on a strict deadline? Not easy at all!

But it all got done. In time for the show. I was only a “little late” for setup.

DSC03900

So the quilt is NOW finished???

Umm….

No…. Not exactly ….

Saturday after the show (1 week later), I kept coming back to the yellow beads and some grey/blue disc beads I had bought before, and several strings of some irregular grey/blue smaller beads.

So I decided, post-quilt-show, to bling up the little star quilt again. More.

The very corners of my quilting have circles, so naturally the flat yellow beads fit directly into those prequilted circles.

And the half circles of the blocks lent themselves to the blue/grey disks.

And then I lined the very outer ring of the half circles with the small irregular beads, and couched them down.

little star with beads

Here is a closeup of it with the embellishments.

closeup of little star applique and beads

I kind of like that I didn’t stop when I thought I would.

Someone called this a ‘flag’ due to the symmetry and the colors and such. so now I think of it as the Little Star Scientific Quilter flag quilt.

I did do more quilting and gluing and stuff, but since I have been so good at posting lots of ‘smaller’ posts lately, I will wrap this up and show you my other progress in future posts.

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16.6 Patience and Persistence

June 23, 2011

Didn’t mean to disappear for the week.  Just busy with life stuff and starting to panic (more) about the upcoming quilt show.

I took my finished (minus some of the beading) Sunflower Patio Dreams quilt to work this week to show it off.

Compliments all around!

The birds have their beaded eyes and the only thing left to stitch before the show is the back /bottom of the sleeve down. (… oh and the ..mmpygh .. *cough* label *cough)

Here’s the red bird with his eye.

And the most often comment I got was: “That’s so beautiful!  I don’t have the patience for that.  How long did that take you?”

To which I said thanks.  And then I said that I worked on it a little bit at a time after lunch sewed down 2 petals or so every day.  So persistence won out.  I also said that I started it in September of 2009, and took a several month break from it several times.  And I said that I still wanted to put beads on the sunflower centers.

I have also pretty much finished my silent auction quilt with the exception of the binding.  And the entire mini sleeve.

Haven’t decided on the name.  Something about early morning colors, but bright eye crushing pink just doesn’t describe the morning light in a positive way as scarlet or crimson.

Also have the borders quilted very very lightly.  Which I may remedy with my own design on the borders that I made up for another quilt.  But my FMQ isn’t all that great yet and I may run out of time.  We’ll see how it goes.

Also getting some thoughts on how to make my purple tilted four patch quilt as you go quilt better.  I think I’ll take a cue from the book I’m borrowing from a friend called, Quilter’s Playtime, and introduce some interrupting strips to make the quilt more artsy.  Still have a few seams to hand sew down on the back, but then I want to add more applique.

Here’s the quilt as it stands.

And the back.

This quilit is definatley not going to win any piecing awards or any free motion quilting awards (some slight tension issues in the middle), but I still may put it into the show.

To do that, I want to make these changes:

Yellow applique strips that cut into all that sashing, and is parallel to the tilt of the blocks.  With a dark gold kicker around the binding and dark purple binding to bring the dark back into the outside.

I may also do (just thinking right now), some little prairie point folded corners in the corners of the binding that mirror the tilt of the blocks.  Not sure how I am going to do this yet, but it may be worth tying the gold back out on the outside.

I have to go, but speaking of patience, persistence, and hexies.  They’ve arrived. Here’s June 12, two weeks ago.

see how they multiply when left to their own devices?

The tribbles of the quilting world.

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10.2 Smile – Now with Butterflies!

January 3, 2011

This post combines several internet things I have seen in the last two days.  One thing is the idea of what makes you smile!

For me, butterflies always make me smile!

 

And I am also looking very heavily about a post/idea of completing monochromatic quilts, one per month.  Now I don’t know if I will actually “play”, but it’s a thought in my mind the last two days anyway.

And the color stated for January is yellow. 

Yellow. 

What can I do with yellow?

But yellow makes me smile, makes me think of the sun.

Rules are you can do monochromatic colors and either black or white, but not black and white.

I somehow don’t tend to pair my quilts with white, but rather black. 

But yellow and black makes me think of a college colors (actually several) and being that it’s not my college, I wanted to stay away from references of this college, which would not be good.

And yesterday morning, I finally bought myself a calendar, and guess what item is on January? 

And guess what color it is?

And this makes me SMILE!

… because I need more to do.

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9.7 Inflorescence Types and other Leaf Drawings

December 21, 2010

While looking up flower types, I noticed a section of the Kansas Grasses and Wildflower site that may be of use to quilters when considering drafting their own flower pictures.

Leaves and flowers all look different, and if you’re willing to ‘go rouge’ and just Frankenstein together a flower with different flower parts, rather than copy a picture of a flower directly, you may want to learn about things like inflorescence.

Flower drawing by Dean Haddock, found on the Kansas Wildflowers and Grasses website.

On the wildflower and grasses site, there are a series of flower and leaf part drawings that do an excellent job of explaining what types of ‘stemming and flower bunches’ (my words) occur without an explanation, just pictures and names. 

This not only gives you the names for the types of flower variations, but may give you some ideas of how to draft your flowers in EQ7 or something similar. 

Think of all the gorgeous applique or embroidery that could take place from this!?

Here are some leaf types.

Flower drawing by Dean Haddock, found on the Kansas Wildflowers and Grasses website.

My sunflower patio quilt has what looks like an ovate leaf shape, with singular inflorescence, for example.