Posts Tagged ‘Chemistry’

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31.8 I come back to this quilt periodically

August 1, 2013

After a year of off and on only stitching the border around my Periodic Spiral quilt, I finally joined the ends the other day.

A couple of years ago, I started off on a journey of tiny hexagons, sewn around batik scraps collected by some of my guild members.

I was inspired by an online “maybe it’s abandoned program” which no one from the program contacted me weather it was okay or not okay to talk about their website in a blog/podcast.

I mean the Periodic Sprial quilt from the diagram on the “Periodic Spiral website“.

I have podcasted about it, blogged about it when deciding my trims, and then mentioned it again when showing some of the embroidery I did for it.

I printed out the PDF from the website onto some Printed Treasures paper.

periodic spiral website on fabric

And then I cut out the group names that I had previously embroidered.

rough layout of periodic quilt trim start

The previous photo was taken about a year ago.

Last weekend, I arranged the periodic table group name labels close to the groups in question.

trim complete periodic spiral embroidery layout

I am planning to outline each of these with trim of some sort (hasn’t been decided yet which trim). And then I am going to embroider a line from the name to the group area.

I remember making one mistake design element two years ago when setting up these hexies into blocks. I never separated non metals & metalloids, the traditional ‘staircase line’ that follows most versions of the periodic table.

So I will have to embroider it in place.

And have I shown you about the shiny fabric???

I had really prepared for this quilt last year, as the letters I made were cut out with fusible on black batik already.  And then the shiny fabric was cut to make a perfect ‘border’ around the black fabric letters.

periodic spiral with letters layout

So this year, I decided to transfer the previously cut and made letters onto the previously cut shiny fabric, after adding fusible webbing to the back of the shiny fabric strip for stability.

I referenced the Tip Sheet for Metallic & Sheer fabrics for a rough idea on how to handle this. Although I currently don’t have it sewn down yet, I think this will be a nice idea.

Really there so far, doesn’t seem to be much to it. A fusible webbing heat set onto the back of the fabric, one of those two sided ones that you have to peel off later.  And then I have my applique pressing sheet to make sure it happens okay. I don’t use the pressing sheet often, but good for me for having it & using it.

Now it is going on my wall, or rather on the front door to my sewing room, and I know I’ve been tempted by the lure of shiny fabrics in my past, but I’m not making the same mistake with this one. I made a pillow out of similar fabrics while in high school, yes it was shiny and cool feeling, but you woke up with face sparklies and for a few days didn’t know why.

The shiny fabric above leers on the edge of “gaudy” or “tacky” but as a silver background, it pops out nice with the forground colors AND evokes all the METALS that can be found as natural elements.

And so what’s probably next for this quilt is to get back out my box of trims (there are more than this) and decide what’s going around all the group names.

box of trims

I still like the black braid outlined in white that I thought about using for the whole center outline, but I have to figure out where to use it that it will go, but not attract too much attention away from the hexagon ‘star’ middle of the quilt.

For now I am contemplating that braid around the key, and maybe a black with silver beads around the group names, and maybe the same black around the words “Periodic Spiral”

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20.4 Periodic Spiral Progress

October 9, 2011

The days are blurring by faster & faster every day now!

I really have to say I love football season for many reasons, one of which is that it’s one time I actually sit down & do some handwork of some kind.

So I’ve been working a little bit on my periodic spiral quilt in between football plays.

I will post some progress pictures here, some of which you’ve seen, some you haven’t.

I have 1 whole section to sew together yet, and one section that is still in rows.

Progress as of today Oct 9th, 2011:

The green section is still in rows, I have to admit sewing the rows to each other is my least favorite part.

Actually all the major colored sections are not sewn to each other either, it’s easier to transport when the thing is still in larger pieces.

This is still a pretty small quilt.  The size of the grey fabric you see in the picture is the size of a television tray, so this is going on the front of my studio door when completed.

The grey fabric will be cut down to ‘mock’ the shape of the spiral & the whole thing will rest on some black/blue hexagon batik fabric purchased in February.

Also, was considering writing the symbols on the quilt in silver pen, and this I may not do now – have not decided for or against it yet.

Here’s some (reverse) progress as I’ve gone along with this quilt.

A few days ago – Oct 5th:

September 10th:

August 21st:

July 20th:

July 14th:

June 26th:

March 17th:

DESIGN (sometime this year or end of last year <Dec2010-Jan2011>):

 

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16.3 More Scientific Hexies from Becky’s Blabber

June 10, 2011

I don’t know how I missed this blog before, but here is a girl after my own heart.

Since we can’t go more than 3.6 hours without hearing/reading the word ‘hexie’ in the quilting world lately (and this includes myself), I thought I’d share some hexie science love that I found on Becky’s Blabber blog.

 

And what are these hexie’s doing?  Becoming molecules!

Well, hexies and penties … but penties are hard to say because they’re so uncommon.

Good job Becky on your first hexie!

 

And this apparently has lead to a lot of hexagon / molecule love for Becky!

And some more in progress blog love can be found here, and here.

 

 

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15.8 SQ Episode 026 – Periodic Table Spiral Quilt

June 5, 2011

Podcast Feed

Ever since I saw the image from Periodic Spiral, I’ve been in love with making this periodic table quilt.

Here’s a PDF of the image of the Periodic Spiral, and here is the link to the Periodic Spiral website.

I can see this exact image as an art quilt posted on a white or black background.  Lots of scrappy choices.

Or each arm could have different colors representing the similarities of each type of elements.

At the beginning of the podcast, I discussed the change of the atomic radius (size of the atom) as shown as trends in the periodic table.  Here’s a visual to what I was trying to discuss.

If you want to see a dot diagram of atomic radius as discussed in the beginning of the podcast, click here.

Further clicks on this link will show more interesting periodic table views of atomic properties.

At the end of the program, I referenced Inkscape, a vector program that can draw lines and curves beautifully.

Here is the image I copied, and the image I created.  Close enough to worry?

Quilting design lila from Sweet Dreams Quilt Studio

Oh:  Follow me on facebook Scientific Quilter, or Twitter @scientificquilt

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2.9 Podcast 6 – Chemical Christmas & Christmas Memories

December 20, 2009

Podcast Feed

This Christmas I have 3 (4) ornaments to share with you.  One chemistry, one yarn, and two fabric wreaths (variations on the same idea).

The Chemistry Borax Crystal Snowflake Ornament

Growing crystals from super saturated solutions is something that you can do easily with household products.  A supersaturated solution is one that you force a liquid (typically liquid solvent) to dissolve more solid (called a precipitate  solute) than it typically can hold.  Most of the time, heating a solution can force the solution to dissolve more solids, and then as the solution cools, the solids come out of solution – sometimes in the form of crystals.  Alton Brown says that even fudge is a crystal structure, so crystals are found everywhere this time of year.

To grow borax crystals

Materials

  • several pipe cleaners
  • something to cut pipe cleaners (NOT fabric scissors)
  • a string or fishing line
  • a pencil or pen
  • a wide glass jar
  • hot (boiling) water – just enough to almost fill up the jar but not too full
  • Mule Team Borax laundry booster
  • (You can substitute sugar crystals for borax, but I think they take longer to crystallize)
  • (I wonder if you could substitute fabric pieces for pipe cleaners.  If anyone does this, I’d be curious to know)

Procedure for creating crystal snowflakes (or you could do a star of david, or other object you want to crystallize)

1.  Cut the pipe cleaner into sections to create the crystalized shape

2.  Tie your fishing line or string around one side of the snowflake.

3.  Place the pencil across the top of the jar such that your ornament hangs in the jar without touching the bottom. 

4.  Any snowflake too high up will not have water on it, and thus may not form crystals.  Make sure the sides don’t touch the jar either for more perfect crystals.

5.  Remove the snowflake once you get it to the right height in the jar. 

6.  Add water to the jar near the top (or you can put this in a microwave safe measuring cup that holds the same amount of water as the jar). 

7.  Microwave for at least three minutes.  If you’re worried about superheating your water, place a chopstick in the water as it sits in the microwave.

8.  Use a hot pad or towel to CAREFULLY remove the jar from the microwave.

9.  Add borax crystals until you can’t get any more to dissolve and start to see borax staying on the bottom.  This takes a lot of stirring and a lot of patience.  I had to remelt my crystals after the first night because I was too impatient and I thought I had enough borax the first night. 

10.  Keep adding and stirring, and if you need to, carefully pour off some of the excess water so you don’t spill over onto the floor.  Remember that the snowflake is also going to displace some of the water so you may have more liquid than you realize.

11.  Add the food coloring to the jar, and then put in the snowflake into the jar.  (the following picture shows too little borax dissolved to get a good result.  Add more borax than this.

12.  Wait overnight at least for the solution to cool to room temperature.  If you have multiple jars / snowflakes you could try putting one in the fridge (be careful!) to see what type of crystals form.  Crystals forms differently with different amounts of starting temperatures and cooling rates.

13.  Take a paper towel and place the completed crystal on the paper towel giving it time to dry.  This snowflake you can see a little bit of blue tint to it with lots of crystals.

 Another ornament I made this year

The dragon boat ornament from Jennifer Ackerman-Heywood at CraftSanity.  I had black yarn available, and I used a piece of cardstock and cut out her template on her site.

Christmas Wreaths made from fabric scraps

Styrofoam Wreaths – Wreath Variation #1

  1. Take a styrofoam wreath shape – cut out from various styrofoam leftovers from presents!
  2. Take scraps of fabric 2 inches square or so – pinked edges look nice here
  3. Wrap the fabric right side towards a pencil
  4. Dip the pencil in Elmer’s glue (or maybe Eileen’s tacky glue)
  5. Stick the fabric into the styrofoam
  6. Repeat the process until the wreath is completed

Wire Wreath – Wreath Variation #2

  • Bend a wire hanger or pipe cleaner into a circle

  • Use small strips of fabric, cut into sections
  • Tie each section of fabric around the wire
  • Repeat for all the fabric pieces around the outside of the wreath.

   

This particular wreath is a little messy.  With more time and patience, these can look quite nice.

Other chemistry christmas ornaments to try

Additional Resources

Christmas Memories

One christmas memory from each of the people in my immediate family that is no longer with me.

Grandpa – Polka music (Watch out it’s loud!)

Grandma – Cross stitched snow globe angel – Free Design at Black Swan Designs

Mother – Lighted candle angel

Grandma – Amazing Grace church

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2.8 Podcast 6 Preview – Chemistry Ornaments

December 18, 2009

Yeah I think I’m addicted to this podcasting thing.  This should be a nice (maybe short?) crafty podcast where I talk about chemistry ornaments.  I never got to doing much physics ornaments because usually we were completing our catapults this time of year.  Projectile ornaments!  Wouldn’t that be fun?

For this ornament that you will probably have time to complete for next year (or this coming week if you hurry, but you have to wait for an overnight step). 

Not so much for quilting though.  Although I did revisit a wreath idea that I remember helping with that had fabric patchwork pieces, which may almost count for quilting.

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1.4 SQ Podcast Episode 1 – What is the Scientific Quilter?

November 10, 2009

 This is the first episode of the Scientific Quilter Podcast.  I am still working on technical issues, so any patience and/or help would be appreciated.

Podcast feed

The completed applique quilt top mentioned in my podcast that took 4 (5) weeks to complete.

Baltimore Style Applique Quilt Top

The pictures of the other projects I am working on will have to wait – I have to spread out my pictures so it looks like I am doing a lot with only a few projects in place!

Here is some places that I mentioned in the podcast.  I will have a whole list on the side of the blogs I follow in the future, but since I mention these in the show specifically, here they are:

Quilting & Crafting Podcasts

Hand Embroidery Websites

Podcast Specific Websites

Thanks for looking and listening.