Posts Tagged ‘fibonacci’

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27.9 Little Feather Fibonacci

October 17, 2012

This last little quilt of my “three little quilt series” is a second Fibonacci quilt, made with the same green Fibonacci fabric, but this is with a different border.

I am less in love with this little border than the cute bubble border on the last Fibonacci quilt but I am leaving it, I quilted it up a little more.

This is also the quilt that on these little borders, I unquilted what I had done, and I had also learned a valuable lesson about bobbin thread.

I am going to show you backwards, the “finished quilting picture” and then move back to show the changes and details.

I call this quilt Feather Fibonacci.

Lets look at the inside fibonacci feather first.

I have been taking the class “beyond the basics” over on craftsy.  And Ann Peterson has you do a ton of feathers.

Well I watched all through the video, of them drawing the feathers, and then quilting them, and I decided the spiral arm looks like a feather spine.

I actually have drawn a couple of times some feathers on my little graph paper notebook some feathers, working out how to move from one feather to the next without always going back to the spine the way Ann does.

And after seeing some close up posts on feathers, I decided to use the method – Start one feather, branch that from the spine, connect to the first feather, then travel the tip of the 2nd feather. then branch off the feather end.

And continue in this way, feather, spine, trace over feather, feather, spine, trace over feather….

Which is an efficient way to quilt but takes some getting used to if you want plump feathers coming off instead of long skinny ones.

Not too terrible for my attempt.

Valuable lesson on this quilt #1.

You don’t have to match the backing fabric to the front, but don’t use a contrasting thread  in the bobbin from the front of the quilt.

Unless your tension is A-100% perfect and can always control your needle, that bobbin thread is going to show through.

Now I admit I wasn’t as ‘analytical’ (read the shortened version of the word) on getting the tension perfect before-hand, so I am not surprised. But I did it and kept going, even when I saw the red thread piling up on the green fabric.

Here’s the back.

Why I chose red thread for the back?  I don’t know.

Probably had more to do with the fact that I had red thread on the bobbin already and I did not have a dark blue on another bobbin.

You can see that for the pebbling practice (aka practice from Craftsy Quilting Negative Spaces with Angela Walters), I chose blue bobbin thread and this was no problem at all.

Only because I ripped out 5 pebbles that looked horrendous with red thread.

Speaking of ripping ….

Let’s talk borders.

The borders of this quilt are dark blue with lots of pattern. no issue with the red bleeding out. But I didn’t like the quilting done initially on the borders. It was my design and I did not like.

The long diamonds just didn’t work all that well for me. I couldn’t execute them well. They were sagging in the middle, and it kept feeling very ‘draggy’ making them.

So I picked them out, watching a bit more of the craftsy class. And then decided to remake them. Same design. Each one shorter Blue on both top & bottom.

Looking closely I still have some tension issues, but now I don’t notice them. And the design is tighter, it’s more coherent, and travels better down the quilt.

But it does blend in so much, it’s really providing texture rather than design.

So where do I go from here?  I think I will NOT rip out the feather despite the red thread showing through.  But I will play it up a tiny bit as intentional – provides some interest. The way I’ll do this I think is to have a very thin red line of piping around the side of the binding.

To make the binding dark blue or green (probably blue) and then a tiny bit of red, just a tiny bit, it will be interesting in color just enough, and then I can move on.

But … one issue. I’ve never done piping on a quilt before.  Next thing to learn. Although the kicker binding will give me some practice enough!

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3.3 Podcast 7 Fun with Fibonacci

January 3, 2010

  

Podcast Feed       

A wonderfully simple, but visually pleasing mathematical topic is called the Fibonacci sequence.  

 What is the Fibonacci sequence?  

 Before you go running off to Wikipedia to find out (it’s somewhat scary – I’m warning you), let me explain Fibonacci here first.  

 The Fibonacci sequence is a series that can continue on forever (something to occupy your kids of school age for a period of time that can add multiple digits – challenge them to find the first 20 or 30 Fibonacci numbers and they’ll stay occupied for a while to give you sewing time).   

  1. You start with the number 1 and the other number 1. 
  2. Then you add the two numbers together: 1 + 1 = 2
  3. Then you add the last two numbers together: 1 + 2 = 3
  4. Then you add the last two numbers together: 2 + 3 = 5
  5. …   3 + 5 = 8
  6. …   5 + 8 = 13
  7. …   and so on … the numbers 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13 …. are the first numbers in the Fibonacci sequence

Personal Fibonacci influences 

Where did I first learn about the Fibonacci sequence?  Square One Television 

 Square One was an educational television program in the late 80’s that helped kids learn math.  There were several other shows that held my interest at this time such as:  Mr Wizard, Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego, Braingames (on HBO), Encyclopedia (also on HBO), which focused on science, geography, brain puzzles, and vocabulary respectively.  

 On Square One, at the end of every episode there was a segment called ‘Mathnet’.  On Dragnet Mathnet, they were detectives that used math to solve crimes, and on one episode (series of episodes) there was a parrot that kept saying “1, 1, 2, 3, 5, eureka”.  It was the Fibonacci parrot.  Listen to the episode to hear my rendition of the parrot and some songs that I sing wonderfully that I embarrass myself for the sake of math.  

Fibonacci in Quilting  

The best example of a Fibonacci quilt that I found was on the blog Christina Creating  

Fibonacci quilt from Christina at Christina Creating

The colors, the contrast, the borders and the binding are just incredibly wonderful in this quilt!  Its informational, educational, visually appealing, square, AND well received by the recipients!  She talks about the process in her favorite quilt post.  No wonder it’s one of her favorite quilts!

Because I missed it the first time, here is a direct quote from Christina Creating about the inspiration for the quilt that she made:            

“I got the idea from the article “Pythagorean Tree” by Diana Venters in AQS’s American Quilter: Ultimate Projects (vol XIX, no 5, 2003).”  I have not been quilting all that long, so do not have access to that article (without going to the library I would guess they may have it).  If you’re into mathematical quilting, look up Diana Venters.            

Inspired by christina’s quilt, I played around in Photoshop a little bit and got a rough draft of a few quilts (or quilt block).  I turned on the grid to help with lining up in Photoshop (go to view / show / grid) 

 

Then I added several of these blocks together and changed some of the colors  

What an easy baby quilt idea this could be?  You could sew strips together of the different colors and just cut and sew them fairly easily. 

Here is the edges of the Fibonacci that shows the grid created by this quilt.  Maybe this would be good fabric pattern? (or not?) 

 

If instead of doing strips, you could do squares of each type.  This is (my) monochromatic version of the painting on the Square One / Mathnet parrot episode. 

You could also use the Fibonacci sequence to find visually pleasing border widths.  If you are stuck on several borders and knowing what widths to use for these, try Fibonacci numbers. 

For example, have a 1 inch border next to a 2 inch border next to a 3 inch border.  Or try a 2 inch border next a 5 inch border or a 1 inch border near an 8 inch border.  

I found a few other mathematical quilting sites along the road              

Including a challenge for mathematics quilts from 2006.         

 

Fibonacci in Nature 

Not all Fibonacci is straight lines and architecture.  Naturally you find Fibonacci in sunflowers.  I am NOT going to count them, but supposedly there are Fibonacci numbers of 34 and 55 on the following sunflower. 

 

 When you stop and look at things that you don’t normally pay attention to, you can find some unusual ideas, depending on how deep you actually look.  After mentioning Fibonacci and doing some Wikipedia research, and seeing tons of sunflower pictures, I stopped in my tracks when cleaning one of my dishes (by hand) and saw the same type of pattern – a Fibonacci pattern on my dish!  Amazing!  Did they purposefully make 13 little “dents” in each spiral?     

 

A natural spiral found in sea shells is shown here with this Wikipedia drawing.  

And if you divide the Fibonacci numbers in this way you get the Golden Ratio, which is also visually pleasing: 

  • 5/3 = 1.5
  • 8/5 = 1.66
  • 13/8 = 1.6
  • … on and on … until you get 1.61

The golden Ratio gives you a visually appealing relationship of 1 on the short side and 1.61 on the long side – many greek architecture follows this golden ratio rule of design. 

Additional Resources

A very comprehensive study of the fibonacci sequence with many pictures and ideas 

Go to Craftster and spread the word there on the quilting podcast posts        

Quilting & Crafting Podcasts mentioned in this podcast 

If you’re mathematically brave, head to the Wikipedia sites on Fibonacci and golden ratio

Thanks to my commenters this week!        

Keep Experimenting!