Posts Tagged ‘medallion quilt’

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37.6 How Round Robins Work

May 23, 2015

This is a post describing how round robins work, or rather, how our round robin worked, complete with pictures.

If you missed a while on the blog or were redirected here from elsewhere, I was included in a multi-group internet friends (twilter-twitter quilter friend) round robin quilt exchange.

One fantastic lady, Daisy of Lazy Daisy Quilts decided to put together a round robin quilt exchange and asked for signups from interested people back at the beginning of 2014.

There were enough ladies who wanted to participate that we had 3 groups: Twilter Round Robin Group A, Twilter Round Robin Group B, Twilter Round Robin Group C. Our group was Group A

Basic Definition of a Round Robin quilt exchange:

Round Robin quilts are long-term projects in which each person works on other peoples’ projects during the time of the round robin, passing along a quilt idea, fabric, and a rapidly growing partial quilt top to each participant until the quilt ends back in the original quilter’s possession.

For me, it all started off with a pattern from electric quilt, a fabric choice & then a block.

center for round robin quilt darla

Here’s the first question I am asked when talking about the round robin: How does it work?

Generally, a round robin quilt (as our group did it) is an agreement between friends or strangers and friends to work on a quilt of someone else’s with the understanding that they will work on yours in return.

My role in the round robin:

  1. I made the center of the quilt. I decided what colors to be used & original quilt direction.
  2. I selected fabrics for the quilt to use in the quilt.
  3. I provide some kind of guidelines or suggestions to the others in the group for working on the quilt.
  4. I send the quilt onto the next person in the list (in the mail or in person). I am always sending to the same next person.
  5. I receive someone else’s quilt in the mail, with their center (or more), their fabrics, their instructions. I am always receiving a quilt from the same previous person.
  6. I work through an appropriate design to add a border to the outside of the quilt. Using math, graph paper, books or websites for inspiration, sometimes electronic quilt blocks or suggestion from Electric Quilt 7 (EQ7).
  7. I follow general guidelines by the round robin coordinator for each round to help spur imagination or direct the appropriate design. Not to be used religiously with all quilts in all situations, but to help stretch each quilter, and attempt to provide harmony with the finished project.
  8. I finish my section of the new border, sometimes making changes due to size restrictions, or fabric shortages which happens because we’re not always great at figuring out in advance what fabrics others would be appealing to the general design or just underestimation. Sometimes this step also requires purchasing fabric of our own.
  9. I write down something interesting in the process in the quilt journal. (optional) I write my name on a label provided by the original quilter (optional, but fantastically helpful in the end).
  10. I send the quilt top with my new border to the same next person in line.
  11. Receive the new quilt, repeat steps 5-10 until the original quilt comes back. I have a full quilt top and a full label and journal.

Twilter Round Robin Group A final collage

 

The coordinator has a lot of decisions to make before getting the round robin started.

The round robin coordinator’s role:

  1. They decide the groups (if more than 6 want to be part of the round robin) 5-6 people seem to be a good match for this round robin.
  2. They create a deadline for each border swap.
  3. The estimate the approximate amount of each type of fabric needed to make the quilt work, suggest the amount of background fabric, focus fabric, and other fabric to be used in making of a quilt top.
  4. The estimate the sizes of each of the borders to be proportional to the space on the quilt.
  5. They create general guidelines to help direct the future quiltmakers down a path to help create a good quilt and/or to ask people to work out of their own comfort zones.
  6. They coordinate the addresses and order of each person to do the round robin.
  7. They answer general questions, help figure out if deadlines need adjusted.
  8. They type up all the info and get it to the participants. Follow up if needed in some areas. Perhaps some handholding or drama-gathering if needed in some groups.
  9. Remind us it’s all fun.

Round Robin Twilter Group A

As you can see above, we had 6 different quilts with 6 different personalities and styles.

How does the passing of the quilts work?

Because we had a round that we passed quilts on to each other, and each person was in a different order, we were able to affect each quilt at a different stage of its development.

  • The first two quilts each of us received, we were only beginning to shape the look and feel of the quilt to follow.
  • The next round brought the middle into focus, the meat of the quilt,
  • The last two rounds were on the finishing side of the round, these were larger & took up more time & fabric.

Our round went like this:

Daisy passes to me, I pass to Diane, Diane pass to Laura, Laura pass to Tami, Tami pass to Tina, Tina pass to Daisy.

twilter round robin how the quilts got passed in a round

And each of us had our own version of that. The drawing above shows how the quilts were passed around.

My role in the round robin Group A, and the quilts as I saw them in the order I worked on them

Round 1 – Daisy

Since Daisy’s was the first round robin quilt I saw, it was the first one I worked on, and thus the smallest round to do.

This is a collage of the completed quilt of Daisy’s (on the left), the block as I received it, and the block as I finished it.

daisys finished quilt center and my portion

Once completed, I wrote in the journal, and on the label, then sent it in the mail to Diane.

Once Daisy was finished with the next quilt – Tina’s quilt, she sent it in the mail to me. As you will see I was always receiving from Daisy and sending to Diane. So I really only had to have 1 address.

Round 2 – Tina

Tina’s quilt only had her center and Daisy’s first border. The sky was the limit here.

tinas finished quilt center and my portion

The picture above is Tina’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 3 – Tami

At the “halfway point” everyone was working on the opposite person’s quilt. I was working on Tami’s quilt when she was working on mine.

tamis finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Tami’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 4 – Laura

Laura’s quilt was based on neutral fabrics. Greys and browns dominated the landscape of this quilt top with dramatic golds and blue hues thrown in for a smidge of color

lauras finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Laura’s finished quilt on the left. Top right is the original block, middle right is the quilt top as I received it, bottom right is the quilt top I sent out.

Round 5 – Diane

Diane’s quilt was mostly done. I was trying to figure out an appropriate finish for her quilt.

dianes finished quilt center and my portion

 

The picture above is Diane’s finished quilt on the left. Which is also the portion that I worked on and sent out to her. Top right is the original block, bottom right is the quilt top as I received it.

More notes about Round Robin Quilts & observations

Since it was a center-focused round robin where we added further borders to the outside of an already ‘finished’ project, so the projects usually take on a medallion feeling.

Each quilter has to essentially be a “border designer”, and has to be willing to either ‘do the math’ or make a program (like EQ7) do the math for them.

I used inspiration from either drawing graph paper, or Electric Quilt 7, or a book on borders, or pinterest pictures, or various books on techniques. Sometimes I tried several different versions of the quilt, but once I kept seeing one version in my mind more than 1 day, that is the variation I went with.

There is an option to do rows instead of medallion rounds, which would be the same amount of work on the last one as on the first one. This would work in a similar way, but are usually called “Row Robin” quilts instead.

The first round we received, we had a shortened timeframe, but we had less size to finish before sending it off. This was stressful for me, but I did get the quilt done by or close to the deadline most of the time.

Each swap we had different goals, different color pallets, different visions to try to work into the quilts. It is truly a good way to sew out of the comfort zone.

And since the twilters who were interested in this swap were all over the US, the boxes got some post office traveling time around the country.

Some of the early quilts I worked on, I was completely surprised with at the end.

We got to learn about each person as reading through the journal entries of the original quiltmaker, in addition to things other people said in the journal. I was inspired by things in the journal in addition to other blocks and items I saw elsewhere. Many times the journal dictated the “tone” of the quilt more than anything!

Math was very helpful in the round robin. Having the original dimensions of each quilt, then trying to figure out how to put blocks together with appropriate spacers was challenging, but a heck of a lot of fun.

It helped me to use a program like EQ7 to help with the math and to visually see if the blocks I were doing were too big or not big enough or if I needed to add spacers.

Often times, I used my moleskin graph paper the most as it was the perfect thing to visually count other parts of the quilt.

Another note was to not try to overshadow the other people’s work. Since I try to do “big bold complicated” this was a constant worry for me, and something that at times reigned me in, and other times I probably ignored. Looking back, I ended up adding a darker border many times to the quilts I received. I don’t know if/what that says about me.

The most important part is to leave a part of yourself in the quilt that you’re working on. Being true to who I am is very important to me, even if I don’t always know what that looks like. So even during the “potential overshadows” I may/maynot have done, I still made quilts that were pleasing to me, that were something that I could do as well as I could.

That’s what matters & that is what’s special about these quilts.

In summary (visual)

The quilts as I worked on them, the center block, what I did to them, and their final product.

Round Robin Progress

Yay for round robins with friends!

 

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37.5 Twilters Entwined

May 4, 2015

Early April, after I got back from my slight failure of quilting the Samurai Sudoku quilt, I had a package waiting for me on the porch!

About a year (okay not quite that long) after we set aside time to do a Round Robin, they have finally come home to their owners. I am so proud of what everyone has done for me, with me in mind, and fantastic piecing skills and color sense!

Darlas round robin quilt finished top

One of the many amazing things about this quilt is that I managed not to look at it for the entire time it was away from home.

In the next post, I will outline how round robins work, but this one I will celebrate my fantastic round robin!

The 30 second explanation: I made the center, sent the fabrics and set of instructions, and others worked on my project just as I worked on theirs.

Daisy’s idea for this round robin was to include a Journal.

darlas round robin box before sending off

I covered my journal with pretty paper from michaels. Sent along the fabrics I posted here above.

darlas rr journal covered

And the ladies doing my round robin wrote all up in the journal too!

I am going to share the rounds and journal too.

I passed my center

center for round robin quilt darla

With my scribblings

darlas journal into page

Then Diane blew up the block to something fantastic & bigger!

darlas round robin dianes round

She posted her thoughts and ideas.

darlas rr journal dianes page

It was great seeing the designs here on paper.

Then she sent to Laura.

darlas round robin lauras round

Who came up with the first mention in the journal about the Entwined border mentioned on Quilter’s Cache site.

darlas rr journal lauras page

But the quilt was too small.

And then the quilt was sent to Tami, who did folded fabrics on all the quilts I saw her work on.

darlas round robin tamis round

And Tami had all sorts of ideas going that I even got 2 journal pages from her. More than that, but these two pages were different, showing the evolution of an idea!

darlas rr journal tamis page 1

darlas rr journal tamis page 2

Its interesting to see the creative process. I LOVE it. By the way some other mention of the Entwined border was here also.

And then the quilt and journal journeyed over to Tina.

darlas round robin tinas round

Who ended up taking the Entwined border idea and running with it, just modifying it slightly to fit Tina & me!

darlas rr journal tinas page

Which also reminds me of my weave quilt that I recently finished the top.

So three Entwined mentions help set me for this in name of the quilt.

And then our fearless leader, Daisy got to round it off.

darlas round robin daisys round

There is such great quilting space here. I love the subtleness of the darker shade of pink. It actually lightens up the center of the quilt a bit.

darlas rr journal daisys page

And yes, it was worth the wait.

So then the final project sent back to me and I found some dark that I had used in the early rounds and just did a quick small border on the outside. I did this because when I went to quilt my Sudoku quilt, I was leaving lots of room on the edges and was ultimately going to cut off a lot of that. This happened 2 days before I put the border on. So I went into paranoia mode about this wonderful quilt top, so to preserve the points, one final round added.

I really didn’t look at this quilt when it was traveling around. I was determined to make it a surprise. I may or may not have been the only one surprised by my quilt in the end. Each group member posted in flickr group when we were finished with our sections. I found I could post to flickr, tag it for a group, but not look through the group.

We had our 6 members. Some groups had 5, some had disastrous setbacks at first.

I trusted my group, and was such a proud member of the group. And they did great on my quilt!

darlas round robin start to finish

We also signed backing labels!

Darla Pink and Purple Round Robin top and name panel

And I am proud to say I have already finished piecing the back!

twilters entwined pink round robin backing

And the journals was just so yummy & special. My favorite non-quilty part!

Darla RR Journal Collage

 

 

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35.9 Better Corner options for the Dancing Ribbon Quilt

July 6, 2014

This seems to work better than what I had last time.

Don’t you think? Just sitting next to the original quilt. I had more undo-ing and re-doing with these corners, but now they are done except the sashing. All I can say is thank goodness for batiks being the same on the back and the front so I didn’t have to recut the pieces I had glued & pinned wrong earlier this weekend.

dancing ribbons on point medallion with corners

I think this is better than the very light, very bright corners.

Not a super fan of the turtles, as they don’t really fit with the ribbons, but the color is just about right. So they’re staying.

Still light blue planned for the sashing between the corners and the center.

I am using Ann Peterson’s technique for adding borders to a previously quilted center. Here’s hoping it works.

I did find the wonder clips a very easy for keeping my paper pieces together while I was sewing them. I got on the lines really really well with these.

using clips to hold pieces in place

 

I don’t know if you can see, but I put pins in each intersection to make sure things line up okay. There is a pin sticking out at the very end of this piece. I find the wonder clips an easy to use and easy to remove and I trust that things are lined up well, as they don’t really shift much.

Been consistent in getting some sewing almost every weekend. My weekend is about to end soon for me. Hope everyone else had a good weekend! I still have to send my round robin box to the next recipient even though it’s been done at my house for a whole week.

Have a great week ahead. I have a guild meeting on Tuesday, so I know I will have a good quilty week.

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35.4 Requilting the Dancing Ribbons Quilt

June 15, 2014

This quilt has had a LOT of ‘redos’ on it, and now I am redoing the”final” quilting as well. This project was considered finished in January of 2013, I put down the 20th to be exact. It has been hanging on the back of my front door in the time since the quilt has been finished – the sleeve went on long ago.

The recent talk of some of my online quilting friends of Round Robins has lead me to look at many different Round Robin pictures on Pinterest & other places, which has caused me to think of how delightful this Dancing Ribbons would look as an on-point center of a larger quilt.

I have been subscribed to Ann Peterson’s Craftsy class “Quilting Big Projects on a Small Machine”, and I was watching it recently, and I think I can take her medallion quilt techniques and put corners on this quilt and set the already quilted quilt on point.

The original design.

Dancing Ribbons at the Show

This quilt has always been special, but it has been missing the “fantastic-ness” I usually love in quilting. That AND I LOVE changing things up, adding a little bit more, and a little bit more.

All this talk about Round Robins and turning a quilt on point reminds me of my favorite picture of my small dancing ribbons quilt.

Dancing Ribbons Quilt

I have also recently been watching Cindy Needham’s Craftsy class on Wholecloth Quilting and between two two classes, I have been brave enough last weekend to rip off the binding, rip out the piping and rip out the adequate but not spectacular FMQ done on the outer edge (which ripping took way too long considering there wasn’t all that much of it really).

So this went from a finished project to an unfinished project that I have renewed excitement about.

I decided a variation of the last post what I want to do with this quilt, posting an EQ7 picture of what I (currently) envision the finished quilt to look like.

dancing ribbons medallion choice5

Over two different days this past week, I have tried to purchase the brighter versions of blue for the outside. I have yet to decide exactly which blues will go. The first batch all the blues were exactly the same shade.

dancing ribbons corner colors

 

 

Now I have a more varied number of blues and a different in between color. Freshly washed.

dancing ribbon fabric choices 2

 

Still living with the colors & values right now to see what I like.

On Tuesday, I spent a generous amount of time creating ‘sunshine & shadows’ (Cindy’s term) by adding crosshatch lines as background filler to the currently finished quilting project.

And a few stitches in the middle of the quilt for the yellow portions.

crosshatch quilting on negative space

Then I found this really great picture of quilting online which inspired my own version of the spade/heart shape, modifying the design of Gerri Smit to put in the corners of my original quilt to give the quilt some light pizzaz.

drawing inspired by a quilt on pintrest

I have improved some on my FMQ this past year, and 2014 is the year of FMQ, so this is very exciting to me right now!

And if you didn’t notice earlier, here are my attempts at adding pizzaz. Didn’t take many different takes at getting this right, this design I didn’t have to practice too much, and it adds so much detail to this quilt.

Dancing Ribbons Freshly quilted with Details

Today was another sewing day, but even though I have momentum on this idea, because I am still hashing out the colors in my head for the right fabric, I changed direction and did some straight line stitching all over my card trick quilt (now my oldest UFO).

Card Trick has been basted for a month or two. I chose an orange/brown color thread over the top of the card trick pieces which I think ties together the colors nicely even though none of that color even shows up on the quilt.

card trick straight quilting in orange brown thread

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35.3 Starting to plan Dancing Ribbons Options

June 7, 2014

The quilt that has been finished f or a while – I recorded the end of January of 2013, is playing up in my mind for updating with a medallion setting.

I haven’t got incredibly far with options for this quilt, but I am thinking a couple of things already.

First I have a psuedo-star option which I like – don’t worry about the fabrics being a little busy, I will take care of that later if I chose this option.

dancing ribbons medallion choice1

I may need to go in and edit this block a little bit to make it more intricate. I don’t really like the off-balance I am attempting to do with the light & dark of the magenta, purple, and turquoise in the corners, but I think this may play off well with the alternating blues on the edges.

I do like this next design as well, which sorta mocks the dahlia look of the center ribbons quilt.

dancing ribbons medallion choice2

I like the circular look of the turquoise border, and there is a good color sense for the thin strips against the dark blue background, but maybe the points in the corners are not my favorite either.

The next design to share uses my good old friend applique in addition to piecing. And I haven’t found the right color balance with it either.

dancing ribbons medallion choice3

But it’s kind of cute. A cute way to frame the quilt without going too overboard. And I could always double ring the applique with a lighter or darker frame as a form of a shadow, which could give a different look.

Or I could do this pretty nice balanced block in the corner, but again struggle with how many of each of the 3 colors hit each corner.

dancing ribbons medallion choice4

Something to think about.

What I might do is to do some sort of celtic knot in the corners instead. I have a couple of books on celtic knots, and perhaps that will give me more of the look I am dreaming about for this quilt. Need to research & plan and design & think about it.

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In other somewhat related news, my first round of a round robin was sent off to the next person on our round robin today. I am happy with my portion of the block I received and I hope Daisy will be too. Of course when Daisy sees it, it will look completely different than it does now.  I am curious to see what I am getting next, but I am so far, deciding to avoid my “Round Robin Flickr group-A” because I am uncertain if I want to see my block progress or not. DON’T click the above link if you want to see your block and you are in the same group.

In other news there are two other groups as well. Group B & Group C. The idea of this round robin is fun. I hope the other two groups get more pictures up – currently there are only 3 pictures and 6 pictures. I just put my hand on the screen to be able to post the link to group A, so I don’t know for certain if there are more pictures or not, but I know a few weeks ago we had 6 or 7 and I just posted one more (without looking). Hoping to see the progress in the other two groups I am not part of, but it’s slightly early for this round as of this time.

I really liked the inverse of the block I created, it would have also been a really cool applique center of a round robin quilt. See? (sorta) – small snippet only is available for you.

small snippet of inverse of daisy round robin

Was going to post the entire inverse block here, but that would be too revealing to what I actually made. Or it could be. And of course these don’t actually line up, I wasn’t being incredibly accurate when placing them down on the sides of the block as those sections are in actuality on the opposite corners of the quilt.

It’s a darn good thing I have weekends to sew. Not getting a ton done the rest of the week. Having a happy time sewing & designing today!

Take care!